Turbotodd

Ruminations on tech, the digital media, and some golf thrown in for good measure.

Posts Tagged ‘the masters

The Masters Day One — The Wrap

leave a comment »

Day one of the 2012 Masters was about what you might have expected, if filled with a few surprises.

Augusta National may have been the “star” today — she was playing very tough, despite the soft greens, and the winds (and, later in the day, light rain) and heavy air, made for some long play.

I can’t remember the number of players who were short (in Rae’s Creek) or right on 13, and only the longest hitters were consistently hitting greens in regulation.

If you take a look at the final leaderboard for the first round, it is, not surprisingly, a “who’s who” of men’s professional golf.  As far as the top of the leaderboard, well, it was Henrik Stenson’s to own at 6 under until a snowman (a quadruple bogey 8) on the closing hole dropped him back to −1 (he’d also bogeyed 16 to take him to 5 under).

Lee Westwood came in “under the radar,” as the announcers kept telling us, shooting a sweet 5 under, his last birdie coming at the 17th.

South Africa’s Louis Oosthuizen came alive in a birdie run on the last five holes to land at 4 under, along with Sweden’s Peter Hanson.

Then, there was a six-way tie for third, including that most interesting man in the world, Spaniard Miguel Anjel Jimenez.

Beyond that, it was your typical PGA log jam, with former Master’s winner Zach Johnson at 2 under, followed by fellow Augusta green jacket owner Vijay Singh, and 2010 FedEx champion Jim Furyk.

Even Steve Stricker’s in the running at 1 under.

That’s where you also found Irishman and favorite Rory McIlroy, while Tiger came in at even par and Phil Mickelson arrived at 2 over, after a disheartening bogey on 18.

Tomorrow is another day, but if today’s play was any indication, round two should be filled with plenty more drama before we see who survives the cut and moves into the weekend and “moving day” on Saturday.

Written by turbotodd

April 6, 2012 at 1:16 am

Masters Update, Mid-Afternoon

leave a comment »

Here’s what I’m seeing at Augusta so far on day one of the 2012 Masters.

Or should I say, what I’m not seeing.

No birdies by anyone on 11, 16, and 18 as of press time.

Tiger just wasted a birdie opportunity on 15, a hole he would typically be in on two but had to chip onto the green for his third shot during today’s round.

Stenson continues his lead at −5, having given up a stroke at 16, with Jason Dufner coming on strong at 3 under through 8 and 10 holes to play.

Lee Westwood is also coming on strong, with three consecutive birdies at 5, 6 and 7.  Keep an eye on Lee — he’s hungry for it.

Keegan Bradley is also playing consistently, 2 under through 16, and tied by both Woods and Woods’ playing partner Miguel Angel Jimenez.

Save for Stenson’s additional two strokes on the field, it’s wide open on day 1!

Written by turbotodd

April 5, 2012 at 7:13 pm

Tiger’s On Amen Corner

leave a comment »

Well, we’re over halfway through Tiger Woods’ first round at Augusta, and he’s about to make his way to the backside of Amen Corner, having parred both 11 and 12 (although his par putt on 12 almost spun out right).

He just hit his tee shot on 13 and wailed one out to the right with a clear shot to the 13th green.

Henrik Stenson is the surprise of the day, having eagled both holes 2 and 8, and now sits at 6 under through 13.

Scotsman Paul Lawrie is hanging in second place having finished his round at 3 under for the day, but there’s still plenty of golf left to play, and Rory McIlroy and Phil Mickelson are just getting their round going.

Spain’s Alvaro Quiros has the shot of the day thus far, having gone into the creek on 13 on the right side of the green, and opting to play a brilliant shot from the hazard, water and all, and planting it about 10 feet past the hole.  He missed the putt for his birdie conversion, but saved par and avoided what could have been the first major disaster of today’s round.

We’ll see what Tiger does with his approach on 13, but if history’s any guide, he’ll be aiming straight for that flag on the far right of the green.

Written by turbotodd

April 5, 2012 at 6:12 pm

The Masters: So Much Tradition, So Much Uncertainty

with 2 comments

If I didn’t have a real job, I could spend this entire week blogging about The Masters.

It’s my favorite sporting event of the year, of all sporting events. If you’re an avid golf fan who knows anything about golf history, that’s kind of the way it must be, at least for American golf.

The Masters was initiated by Clifford Roberts and beloved amateur golfer, Bobby Jones, at Augusta National, a new course Jones had built in Augusta, Georgia.  The first Masters was played in March 1934, officially billed as “Augusta National Invitational.”

Jones himself came out of retirement to play the tournament, which helped bolster awareness of the new tournament that was destined to become the pinnacle of American golf’s four majors.

Over the years, it attracted and helped craft the legends of the best of the best in golf: Ben Hogan, Gene Sarazen, Sam Snead, Byron Nelson, Arnold Palmer, Gary Player, Tiger Woods.

To date, Jack Nicklaus was the record for the most Masters victories: Six. Tiger Woods and Arnold Palmer have four each.

My handicapping for this year’s tournament? Well, I’d say like any major, it’s a pretty wide open field. But, if I were a gambling man, I’d certainly have Rory McIlroy, Phil Mickelson, and Tiger Woods up at the top of my list.

Hunter Mahan, fresh off his Shell Open victory in Houston yesterday, with a putter that is mostly sizzling, would lead the next tier, a group to which I would include Graeme McDowell, Luke Donald, and Angel Cabrera.

I also wouldn’t rule out Jason Day, Jason Dufner, or even South Korean newbie Sang-moon Bae.

But my money’s going to be on that first group. Tiger’s victory at Bay Hill was well-timed, and his laser iron shots were made for Augusta (and let’s not forget Tiger tied for 3rd last year at Augusta). And Rory demonstrated in last summer’s U.S. Open he could move past the psychological barrier of the hole 10 disaster at Augusta and literally run away with a major victory.

So, it’s anybody’s guess, really.  And that’s why we golf fans love The Masters so much.

It has so much tradition…and yet so much uncertainty.

Written by turbotodd

April 2, 2012 at 3:02 pm

IBM Health Tech: Just What The Doctor Ordered

leave a comment »

I’m going to stop focusing on golf and the Masters…err, work…I meant work…long enough to indulge in a few moments of celebration on this, World Health Day.

One of my fave IBM PR colleagues, Holli, reminded me of the fact that IBM had made another key healthcare related announcement recently, the first biodegradable nanoparticles that can seek out and destroy drug-resistant bacteria (and no, that did NOT come straight out of a Michael Crichton novel, although it sounds like it could’ve).

Earlier this week, IBM Research explained the ground breaking early research discovering new types of nanoparticles that are physically attracted like magnets to MRSA cells, ignoring healthy cells completely and targeting and killing the bacteria by poking holes in its walls.

Okay, Turbo, you’re thinking to yourself, so what?

So what, is that this discovery could greatly improve the effectiveness of medication, as this nano approach would be a fundamentally different mode of attack compared to traditional antibiotics.  And, I suspect, it could provide for some pretty cool-looking injection devices!

Remembering this is IBM’s Centennial, we’re also unveiling an “icon of progress” representing IBM’s contributions to fighting infectious diseases and contributions to world health.

A few reminders of those contributions: IBM helped bring to market the first continuous blood separator which led to treatment for leukemia patients; the first heart lung machine to keep patients alive during surgery; and the first excimer laser used in LASIK eye surgery…among many others.

IBM’s Health Focus Has Never Been Better

Consider this: One in every eight of the earth’s inhabitants will be over 65 by 2030, and more than one billion people are overweight and another 388 million people will die in the next 10 years from a chronic illness.

New ways to treat illnesses and and transform how healthcare is delivered around the world are critical for both the health of our populations and our economies.

Recognizing World Health Day, IBM is also applying it expertise to address public health issues such as in Cross River State, Nigeria, here biometric identification and solar energy are just a few of the technologies in use to provide access to free healthcare and reduce child and maternal mortality rates by a goal of 50 percent by the end of 2011.

Through the years, IBM has also created hardware and applications specifically designed to improve care, diagnosis and treatment of disease, and advance how medical knowledge is shared.

  • Working with the World Health Organization, IBM precisely mapped outbreaks of smallpox in 1976. This effort contributed to the eventual eradication of the disease in the general population a few years later.
  • In the early 1990s IBM and the University of Washington built a prototype of the first medical imaging system.
  • IBM’s World Community Grid, released in 2004, continues to use pervasive networking and crowdsourcing to apply supercomputer levels of processing power to urgent healthcare and societal needs such as fighting AIDs, cancer and dengue fever and malaria.
  • Using IBM’s Blue Gene supercomputing simulations, researchers at IBM and the University of Edinburgh are currently collaborating on lab experiments to design drugs aimed at preventing the spread of the HIV virus.
  • IBM is working with Roche on new nanopore-based technology that will directly read and sequence human DNA quickly and efficiently. The technology has the potential to improve throughput and reduce costs to achieve the vision of whole human genome sequencing at a cost of $100 to $1,000.

The Diagnosis: Improving Healthcare-Related Information Flow

Today, IBM is turning its focus to healthcare transformation, helping entire countries develop new patient-centric models of care, connecting health information and enabling deep analytics of medical data.

At the heart of any healthcare transformation are electronic health records, the basic building blocks of healthcare efficiency.

IBM has a long history of creating and connecting systems to share patient information. When standardized and shared, electronic health records provide a powerful means of increasing accuracy and speeding the delivery of patient information to the point of care. They enable better collaboration, more complete records, and better service.

Advanced health analytics provides new insight into the treatment of disease, can speed discovery of new drugs and therapies, and empowers healthcare providers with better information to improve care.

IBM’s work to create smarter healthcare systems, optimized around the patient, is aimed at reducing medical errors, achieving better patient safety and quality outcomes and saving lives.

This year marks IBM’s centennial and healthcare continues to be one of its most important areas of industry focus. The company spends more than $6B a year on R&D, much of it on healthcare, and IBM is one of the few technology companies with large teams of physicians and other clinicians on staff to ensure healthcare’s most pressing needs are met.

Check out the video below to learn how IBM is helping harness the power of electronic medical records.

You can go here to learn more about IBM’s Centennial.

And don’t forget to schedule that physical!

Written by turbotodd

April 7, 2011 at 6:47 pm

%d bloggers like this: