Turbotodd

Ruminations on tech, the digital media, and some golf thrown in for good measure.

Posts Tagged ‘netbooks

Netbooks In Africa

with one comment

How about a netbook for $190 U.S.?

Today, Canonical and IBM announced a partnership with Simmtronics to offer the Simmtronics netbook, the Simmbook, to emerging markets at just that price.

Starting in South Africa, the Simmbook is preloaded with IBM Client for Smart Work, which includes IBM Lotus Symphony (productivity suite), access to IBM LotusLive cloud collaboration services, and the choice to add other IBM Lotus collaboration software like Lotus Notes and Lotus Sametime.

This move helps bridge the gap between low price and high performance, providing a desirable form factor (the netbook) with an affordable software and OS footprint, one that provides a better computing option for those in small-medium businesses, non-profits, and even academia which might not otherwise be able to afford these types of collaboration resources.

“As Africa makes economic strides during a time when new technologies like cloud computing are emerging, the Simmbook netbook with LotusLive, Lotus Symphony, Lotus Notes and Ubuntu Linux provides businesses with a complete solution at an affordable price,” said Clifford Foster, IBM sub-Saharan CTO.

“CIO’s, IT directors and IT architects from all type of organizations in South Africa — even those that typically cannot afford new, expensive personal computers — can now legitimately consider netbooks instead of PCs for business use.”

Designed specifically for mobile computing, the Simmbook provides the power of a full-sized laptop in a compact body. IBM Client for Smart Work is IBM and Canonical’s complete desktop package that’s open, easy to use, and offers a security-rich alternative to costly, proprietary PC software, such as Microsoft Windows.  It  can help lower costs by up to 50 percent of a typical Microsoft PC.

Simmtronics is working closely with IBM to provide low cost computing in emerging markets around the world.   In addition to African countries, the low-cost Simmbook will also be available in India, Thailand and Vietnam.

The new Simmbook preloaded with IBM Client for Smart Work can be purchased online directly from Simmtronics using this order form http://www.simmtronics.com/order_form.php.  Simmtronics and IBM plan to continue to work with clients to offer the Simmbook at a competitive price to other countries around the world.

Written by turbotodd

March 25, 2010 at 9:44 pm

Car Windows

with 4 comments

Is anybody but me getting a sudden influx of Facebook SPAM?

I’m suddenly getting notices from my “friends” with links to some Blogspot address asking me to watch some video.

Oy vey.  I wonder if that could somehow be a viral video campaign related to today’s Windows 7 launch.

Speaking of which, I haven’t yet figured out how to get Windows 7 on my Acer netbook.  It’s currently got a dual boot with both Ubuntu Netbook Remix and Windows XP, but because most netbooks don’t have a DVD or CD-ROM drive, upgrading is going to be a big challenge.

I’ve visited both the Windows marketing pages as well as the Microsoft store, and there’s no information on the Netbook upgrade version (from which you can load via USB device, or so I had heard) of Windows 7.

So, all that hard work by Microsoft on getting W7 tuned up and ready for the netbook market…well done!

I did stumble onto this post from the Windows 7 blog, which announced a number of special offers and promotions, including a Windows 7 launch party in NYC.

You know, I really would try and make it, but alas, I have to head to a meeting to watch some paint dry.

David Pogue has a review on The New York Times with the following headline: Windows 7 Keeps the Good, Tries to Fix Flaws.

Not exactly a ringing endorsement, but then again Pogue is an unabashed Apple fanboy (Full disclosure: So am I.)

But, being a technology dude, I find it is my geeksworn duty to try as many technologies as I possibly can, from IBM and from our competitors, so that I can better understand the state of the market.

That said, I never tried Microsoft Vista, save for one time when I was at a Gartner Symposium in the fall of 2003, and I got to try out an early beta.

I thought it really cool that Vista was going to include RSS feeds (RSS feeds were pretty new back then…amazing how so many people still don’t know what they are!)  Other than that, I just couldn’t see it, especially with all the additional horsepower it required.

No, for me, Windows XP was always good enough, and like so many, I never found a compelling reason to upgrade to Vista.  And then, I discovered Mac OS X.

For my money, operating systems should be like car engines…they should just work.  Turn the key.  Engine cranks.  Off you go.

And for me, Mac OS X has been a pretty good working engine, and considering that it’s basically a UNIX derivative with a nice GUI overlay, I guess I shouldn’t be surprised.

If Windows 7 can provide the kind of stability and an elegant GUI that OS X has been providing for years, then by golly, knock yourself out.

I’d certainly consider putting it on my Acer netbook…but I’m definitely not interested in spending days under the hood trying to figure out how to do so.

Kinda defeats the point if I can’t get in and just turn on the engine and drive.

Written by turbotodd

October 22, 2009 at 2:05 pm

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