Turbotodd

Ruminations on tech, the digital media, and some golf thrown in for good measure.

Posts Tagged ‘mobile market

Think Big, iPad Small

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It’s a big day in tech, all the way around.

We’ll continue our mission to “Think Big” here in Las Vegas at the IBM Information On Demand 2012 event.

We’ll also get a glimpse into how big the mobile market is becoming as Facebook announces its earnings after the bell later today.

But of course, one of the biggest stories of the day has to do with the downsizing of one of our favorite tablets, the Apple iPad.

Rumors abound about the new iPad “Mini,” which I very look forward to referring to as my “MiniMePad.”

If you’re using an Apple device (including an AppleTV), you should be able to tune in to watch the announcement live starting at 10 AM PST.

If not, there will be shortage of bloggers out there giving you the blow-by-blow.

Why am I so interested in the Mini iPad?

First, Apple set the bar for tablets with the original iPad, which I still use to this day.

Second, the smaller form factor is raising a lot of questions about price. Can Apple afford to take down the price from $499 to the $200 range, especially when their iPod Touch is still priced at $299 (the last time I looked…I can’t look this morning, as the Apple store is down getting busy for the Mini introduction).

I’d say the question more is, can they afford not to? Like the early browser wars, this is a market AND mindshare battle.  iOS and Android are lined up for a full cage death match, and if Apple’s to maintain its market share lead of 69.6% (as of Q2 2012), they’re going to have to compete aggressively on price.

The new Nexus 7 and Kindle Fire HDs are coming in at under $200, and while I doubt that’s a price Apple can match, they’re going to have to strive to stay somewhat price competitive, figuring the Apple premium could be worth $100 per unit or so.

Third, the original iPad was the starting line of the shift away from desktop-centric technology, and as Microsoft attempts to come into this market with its Surface tablet, a key question emerges: Can Apple continue to entice productivity hounds away from the Microsoft ecosystem, despite the advent of the Surface, and stay price competitive in a burgeoning competitive market?

As for me, you might ask, will I buy one?  I’ll never say never. The iPad has become a full-on personal entertainment and productivity workhorse for me, an elegant blended use case of both the personal and the professional.

I watch movies on the thing, I use it for blogging and broadcasting, I play games, I do email, I read books, I hold conference calls.  There’s not a lot I can’t do on it.

So, I can easily justify the upgrade, and I’d love to get a faster iPad, but like with the original, I may wait for an initial software upgrade so Apple has the opportunity to work some of the kinks out.

Then again, I may not.

The App Economy: Creating Nearly 500,000 New Jobs

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This just in from TechNet, a bipartisan policy and political network of technology CEOs that promotes the growth of the innovation economy.

TechNet's new report, "Where The Jobs Are: The App Economy," reveals how smartphones, tablets, and other devices are creating a wealth of new jobs in the U.S.

They released a study yesterday showing there are now roughly 466,000 jobs in the “App Economy,” as they refer to it, in the United States.

That’s up from “zero” in 2007.

Remembering, of course, that the iPhone wasn’t introduced until June 2007 (and I guess the BlackBerry before that didn’t count!).

Here’s what Rey Ramsey, the President and CEO of TechNet, had to say about the report: “America’s App Economy — which had zero jobs just 5 years ago before the iPhone was introduced, demonstrates that we can quickly create economic value and jobs through cutting-edge innovation. Today, the App Economy is creating jobs in every part of America, employing hundreds of thousands of U.S. workers today and even more in the years to come.”

In terms of U.S. urban centers, the top metropolitan area for App Economy jobs turns out to be New York City (9.2 percent) and its surrounding area, although San Francisco and Silicon Valley combined make up for 14.8 percent.

In terms of states, of course, California runs away with it at 23.8 percent, followed by New York at 6.9%.

The research also revealed that when it comes to employment impacts, each app represents jobs across a wide spectrum of roles: programmers, user interface designers, marketers, managers, and support staff.

They include jobs at “pure” app firms like Zynga (which makes games for Facebook) as well as app-related jobs at large companies like EA, Amazon, AT&T, as well as app “infrastructure” jobs at firms like Google, Apple, IBM, Facebook, and others.

Written by turbotodd

February 8, 2012 at 6:54 pm

2010 IBM Tech Trends Survey: All About The Mobile And Cloud

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I’ve been in NYC much of this week attending IBM meetings as well as meeting with key IBM partners.

I had the opportunity to attend a Google Tech event at the NYC Googleplex on Wednesday, and got the lowdown on their view of the current interactive marketplace, including the continued and ridiculous growth of the smartphone market.

One Google exec indicated that 200,000 Android smartphones are being sold every day, and that Google had witnessed a 50% increase in mobile search queries in the first half of this year alone.

Well, it seems as if an audience of you IT professionals out there are agreeing on the growth and importance of mobile (among other key areas) in a new survey IBM developerWorks recently conducted, the 2010 IBM Tech Trends Survey.

The headlines? Mobile and cloud computing will emerge as the most in-demand platforms for software application development and IT delivery over the next five years.

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Developers and IT specialists polled by IBM around the globe indicated that the mobile market would emerge as the hottest software development realm by 2015.

And The Survey Says…

The 2010 IBM Tech Trends Survey provides insight into the most significant enterprise technology and industry trends based on responses from 2,000 IT developers and specialists across 87 countries.

According to the survey, more than half of all IT professionals – 55 percent — expect mobile software application development for devices such as iPhone and Android, and even tablet PCs like iPad and PlayBook, will surpass application development on all other traditional computing platforms by 2015.

With the proliferation of mobile devices, industry analysts are predicting mobile applications sales will undergo massive growth over the next three years (as if they haven’t already!), with estimates of mobile application revenues expanding from $6.2 billion this year to nearly $30 billion by 2013!

Supporting the growing number of software developers creating new applications for mobile devices, IBM now offers no-cost mobile computing technology resources, through IBM developerWorks, for application development on mobile platforms such as iPhone, iPad, HTML5 and Android.

IBM also today launched the first developerWorks mobile application for the Apple iPhone, providing developers around the world with mobile access to build skills and network with colleagues using the professional social networking platform, My developerWorks, built on IBM Lotus Connections.

Additional headlines from the IBM Tech Trends Survey include:

  • 91 percent anticipate cloud computing will overtake on-premise computing as the primary way organizations acquire IT over the next five years
  • Mobile and cloud computing are followed by social media, business analytics and industry-specific technologies as the hottest IT career opportunities beginning in 2011
  • 90 percent believe it is important to possess vertical industry-specific skills for their jobs, yet 63 percent admit they are lacking the industry knowledge needed to remain competitive
  • Telecommunications, financial services, healthcare, and energy and utilities rank as the top four industries in which respondents identify as having the greatest opportunity to expand their careers.

The online survey, conducted by IBM developerWorks of its eight million registered users in August and September 2010, includes responses from IT professionals with expertise in areas such as enterprise and web application development, system and network administration, and software testing and architecture.

IBM developerWorks Announces New Resources for IT Professionals

IBM today announced additional resources, through IBM developerWorks, to help professionals build skills to prepare for the next generation of IT and application development opportunities. The no-charge resources include:

  • New cloud computing resources including online workshops, skills tutorials, cloud computing technical resources, and social networking tools that enable users to build online relationships, share content, and grow a worldwide network of peers to drive innovation.
  • Cloud Computing for Developers virtual events this October, with four dates when IT professionals can learn how to solve business and technical challenges in the cloud. Through real-world examples of specific challenges and solutions as well as live demos of techniques and products, attendees can learn more about how to use and build cloud-based applications such as Platform as a Service (PaaS) and Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) using IBM and open technologies.
  • An online Industry Resource Site that provides technical resources, collaboration forums, articles, podcasts and tutorials on key IBM and open technologies-based best practices in banking, energy and utilities, healthcare, government and chemical and petroleum industries
  • Technical information on the IBM Industry Frameworks, a combination of software and hardware that bridges the gap between general purpose middleware and industry specific business applications to help organizations apply technology more easily to their unique industry.

Today, developerWorks is the largest and most visited global site to gain technology skills.

Over four million IT professionals visit developerWorks each month to gain no-cost access to software tools and code, IT standards and best practices across various industries. Users also tap skills training in IBM software and open technologies including Linux, Java, XML and cloud computing.

I am proud to say I’ve personally been affiliated with developerWorks for several years now through my blogging efforts, and in my partner podcasts with developerWorks podcasting guru and all-around media star, Scott Laningham.

You can go here to learn more about IBM developerWorks, which, by the way, just celebrated its 11th birthday.

Happy birthday, developerWorks!

Written by turbotodd

October 8, 2010 at 1:53 pm

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