Turbotodd

Ruminations on tech, the digital media, and some golf thrown in for good measure.

Posts Tagged ‘mit

IBM and MIT to Pursue Joint Research in Artificial Intelligence

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IBM and MIT today announced that IBM plans to make a 10-year, $240 million investment to create the MIT–IBM Watson AI Lab in partnership with MIT. The lab will carry out fundamental artificial intelligence (AI) research and seek to propel scientific breakthroughs that unlock the potential of AI.

The collaboration aims to advance AI hardware, software and algorithms related to deep learning and other areas, increase AI’s impact on industries, such as health care and cybersecurity, and explore the economic and ethical implications of AI on society. IBM’s $240 million investment in the lab will support research by IBM and MIT scientists.

The new lab will be one of the largest long-term university-industry AI collaborations to date, mobilizing the talent of more than 100 AI scientists, professors, and students to pursue joint research at IBM’s Research Lab in Cambridge — co-located with the IBM Watson Health and IBM Security headquarters in Kendall Square, in Cambridge, Massachusetts — and on the neighboring MIT campus.

The lab will be co-chaired by IBM Research VP of AI and IBM Q, Dario Gil, and Anantha P. Chandrakasan, dean of MIT’s School of Engineering. IBM and MIT plan to issue a call for proposals to MIT researchers and IBM scientists to submit their ideas for joint research to push the boundaries in AI science and technology in several areas, including:

  • AI algorithms: Developing advanced algorithms to expand capabilities in machine learning and reasoning. Researchers will create AI systems that move beyond specialized tasks to tackle more complex problems, and benefit from robust, continuous learning. Researchers will invent new algorithms that can not only leverage big data when available, but also learn from limited data to augment human intelligence.
  • Physics of AI: Investigating new AI hardware materials, devices, and architectures that will support future analog computational approaches to AI model training and deployment, as well as the intersection of quantum computing and machine learning. The latter involves using AI to help characterize and improve quantum devices, and also researching the use of quantum computing to optimize and speed up machine-learning algorithms and other AI applications.
  • Application of AI to industries: Given its location in IBM Watson Health and IBM Security headquarters and Kendall Square, a global hub of biomedical innovation, the lab will develop new applications of AI for professional use, including fields such as health care and cybersecurity. The collaboration will explore the use of AI in areas such as the security and privacy of medical data, personalization of healthcare, image analysis, and the optimum treatment paths for specific patients.
  • Advancing shared prosperity through AI: The MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab will explore how AI can deliver economic and societal benefits to a broader range of people, nations, and enterprises. The lab will study the economic implications of AI and investigate how AI can improve prosperity and help individuals achieve more in their lives.

In addition to IBM’s plan to produce innovations that advance the frontiers of AI, a distinct objective of the new lab is to encourage MIT faculty and students to launch companies that will focus on commercializing AI inventions and technologies that are developed at the lab. The lab’s scientists also will publish their work, contribute to the release of open source material, and foster an adherence to the ethical application of AI.

Both MIT and IBM have been pioneers in artificial intelligence research, and the new AI lab builds on a decades-long research relationship between the two. In 2016, IBM Research announced a multi-year collaboration with MIT’s Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences to advance the scientific field of machine vision, a core aspect of artificial intelligence.

The collaboration has brought together leading brain, cognitive, and computer scientists to conduct research in the field of unsupervised machine understanding of audio-visual streams of data, using insights from next-generation models of the brain to inform advances in machine vision. In addition, IBM and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have established a five-year, $50 million research collaboration on AI and Genomics.

For more information, visit MITIBMWatsonAILab.mit.edu.

Written by turbotodd

September 7, 2017 at 9:09 am

Watson To Take On Harvard And MIT

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Watson went to Boston earlier today to take on students from Harvard and MIT in a friendly game of "Jeopardy!"

At last week’s Information On Demand event in Las Vegas, we heard a lot about how the Watson technology is starting to permeate the marketplace.

There was much discussion around the use of Watson by Seton Hospitals using the new IBM Content and Predictive Analytics for Healthcare solution, and also about the continued expansion of Watson into other industries.

Today, we learned that IBM is headed to Harvard with Watson.  Not to go back to school, but to present a Watson symposium with the Harvard Business School and the MIT Sloan School of Management.

This event is bringing together some of the brightest academic minds to collaborate on the use of advanced analytics, like those powering Watson, to transform the way the world does business.

As part of the symposium, teams of students from Harvard and MIT will put their skills to the test in a demonstration of IBM Watson’s question answer (QA) capabilities in an exhibition game of the TV quiz show “Jeopardy!”

The commercialization of Watson technology means that today’s students will require new skill sets when they enter the job market. As future leaders in a wide range of industries and entrepreneurial ventures, students will need to combine business skills and knowledge with advanced analytical techniques to compete successfully in the world economy.

For example, when applied to banking and finance industry, Watson-like technologies can uncover hidden patterns in data that can rapidly identify market trends, and provide deep, integrated risk analysis. This provides financial services professionals a more accurate picture of their market positions, helping them better assess risk and hedge their financial exposures.

“Great technology companies like IBM are converting the seemingly impossible into reality these days, to the point that it’s hard to keep up with all the digital innovations and their business implications,”said Andrew McAfee, principal research scientist, MIT.

“So we thought it would be a good idea to devote a day to discussing them, and also seeing them in action. We’re going to spend the morning talking computer science and economics with the world’s leading experts in these fields, then cheer our students on against Watson in the afternoon. I predict at least a second place finish for the MIT team.”

Harvard Business School and MIT Sloan School of Management are the first two business schools where IBM will co-host a Watson symposium.

A team of researchers from MIT, led by Boris Katz, principal research scientist at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, contributed code to the QuestionAnswer capabilities in Watson.

Harvard Business School’s Professor Shih recently wrote an in-depth case study of Watson that is will be used by MBA students in the School’s required first-year course Technology and Operations Management.

Follow the event and share your thoughts at #IBMWatson and the live blog at www.asmarterplanet.com, or via Facebook at www.facebook.com/ibmwatson

Written by turbotodd

October 31, 2011 at 5:30 pm

Live @ Lotusphere, Day 3: MIT’s Dr. Andrew McAfee On The Future Of Social Business

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It’s day 3 of Lotusphere 2011.  We’re in the homestretch.

But as we heard earlier this morning, there’s still a whole lot of social business to get done.

Although when Kristin Lauria, VP marketing, IBM Collaboration, hit the stage at this A.M.’s keynote, she was quick to remind the crowd in the room and watching via Livestream that there had already been around 9,500 Lotusphere-related Tweets and 23K blog entries during Lotusphere 2011!

There’s also been a palpable social business buzz throughout the event…a very social buzz.

Lauria kicked off her introductory comments by explaining that the morning keynote would be a great one for people who are always thinking, and who are doing thought provoking things.

MIT's Dr. Andrew McAfee makes some predictions and forms some conclusions about social business for the Lotusphere 2011 audience on Wednesday here in Orlando, Florida.

One of those people is Dr. Andrew McAfee with the MIT Center for Digital Innovation.  It was Mr. McAfee who came to coin the term “Enterprise 2.0” back in 2005.

With Lauria handing him the stage, McAfee joked he didn’t especially like the term “social business,” but the weather contrast between Boston and Orlando was too attractive to ignore, and that, anyway, he didn’t really care what the industry called it, that he was focused on what change and results it could bring about.  He has, in fact, spent much of the last few years of his career researching and writing about it.

McAfee explained he would make 5 conclusions, 1 unfounded claim, and 2 predictions (a theme of the morning session).

First, his conclusions about social business:

  1. Weak ties are strong. You’re most distant colleagues and friends are actually incredibly valuable to you.
  2. Crowds can be very wise. Markets work, can best organize and allocate resources (not perfectly, but good enough), and therefore can ascertain likely outcomes better than individual experts (He used the Hollywood Stock Exchange as an example, which very accurately predicts movie box office grosses).
  3. With more eyeballs, more bugs are shallow (with a nod to Linus’s Law).
  4. There are diamonds in the social data mine. Ex. Google searches that foreshadow movements in housing prices/sales.
  5. Being social benefits individuals. That is to say, the better your network is, the more productive you are, and the more likely you will miss the next round of layoffs!

McAfee then made his unfounded claim: That being social benefits the enterprise, and is a very productive way for a company to improve its performance and competitive posture.

He cited the McKinsey survey from late last year that finds companies using the Web intensively gain greater market share and higher margins (and are some 57% more effective than those who don’t).

Finally, McAfee’s predictions:  1) We’re heading into an era of digital boost, amplified by these social business technologies.  Our toolkit of technology has already reinvigorated productivity.

And 2) There will also be a digital spread (not a rising tide that lifts all boats equally).

That is to say, it’s still an investment that can separate laggards from leaders.

Turning your back on social business would be a great way to become one of the laggards.

Written by turbotodd

February 2, 2011 at 3:30 pm

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