Turbotodd

Ruminations on tech, the digital media, and some golf thrown in for good measure.

Posts Tagged ‘lotusphere

Live @ Lotusphere, Day 3: MIT’s Dr. Andrew McAfee On The Future Of Social Business

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It’s day 3 of Lotusphere 2011.  We’re in the homestretch.

But as we heard earlier this morning, there’s still a whole lot of social business to get done.

Although when Kristin Lauria, VP marketing, IBM Collaboration, hit the stage at this A.M.’s keynote, she was quick to remind the crowd in the room and watching via Livestream that there had already been around 9,500 Lotusphere-related Tweets and 23K blog entries during Lotusphere 2011!

There’s also been a palpable social business buzz throughout the event…a very social buzz.

Lauria kicked off her introductory comments by explaining that the morning keynote would be a great one for people who are always thinking, and who are doing thought provoking things.

MIT's Dr. Andrew McAfee makes some predictions and forms some conclusions about social business for the Lotusphere 2011 audience on Wednesday here in Orlando, Florida.

One of those people is Dr. Andrew McAfee with the MIT Center for Digital Innovation.  It was Mr. McAfee who came to coin the term “Enterprise 2.0” back in 2005.

With Lauria handing him the stage, McAfee joked he didn’t especially like the term “social business,” but the weather contrast between Boston and Orlando was too attractive to ignore, and that, anyway, he didn’t really care what the industry called it, that he was focused on what change and results it could bring about.  He has, in fact, spent much of the last few years of his career researching and writing about it.

McAfee explained he would make 5 conclusions, 1 unfounded claim, and 2 predictions (a theme of the morning session).

First, his conclusions about social business:

  1. Weak ties are strong. You’re most distant colleagues and friends are actually incredibly valuable to you.
  2. Crowds can be very wise. Markets work, can best organize and allocate resources (not perfectly, but good enough), and therefore can ascertain likely outcomes better than individual experts (He used the Hollywood Stock Exchange as an example, which very accurately predicts movie box office grosses).
  3. With more eyeballs, more bugs are shallow (with a nod to Linus’s Law).
  4. There are diamonds in the social data mine. Ex. Google searches that foreshadow movements in housing prices/sales.
  5. Being social benefits individuals. That is to say, the better your network is, the more productive you are, and the more likely you will miss the next round of layoffs!

McAfee then made his unfounded claim: That being social benefits the enterprise, and is a very productive way for a company to improve its performance and competitive posture.

He cited the McKinsey survey from late last year that finds companies using the Web intensively gain greater market share and higher margins (and are some 57% more effective than those who don’t).

Finally, McAfee’s predictions:  1) We’re heading into an era of digital boost, amplified by these social business technologies.  Our toolkit of technology has already reinvigorated productivity.

And 2) There will also be a digital spread (not a rising tide that lifts all boats equally).

That is to say, it’s still an investment that can separate laggards from leaders.

Turning your back on social business would be a great way to become one of the laggards.

Written by turbotodd

February 2, 2011 at 3:30 pm

Live @ Lotusphere 2011: IBM Senior VP Jon Iwata On Making A Social Business Market

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Greetings, Lotuspherians…and those beyond who wish they were here.

After a night of Tweetups and parties and bar talk and heaven only knows what other tidings going on in here in Orlando, it was time to awaken early and get your social business vitamin shot.

IBMs’ Mike Rhodin and Jon Iwata delivered early and often in their opening remarks on Day 2.

IBM's Mike Rhodin explains the challenges and opportunities of social business for the Lotusphere 2011 audience in Orlando, Florida.

Rhodin is Vice President, IBM Industry Solutions, and picked up on a theme he started to deliver in the marketplace at last fall’s IBM Industry Summit in Barcelona.

With a nod to Alister Rennie’s comments from Day 1, he acknowledged that the market is shifting to a new era of social business, and that we heard yesterday from a wide variety of clients about the obstacles and opportunities.

And, more importantly, noted Rhodin, we heard from one another, our fellows in business and industry about the steps we’re taking to build smarter, more social businesses.

Rhodin then encapsulated the challenges and opportunities.  The challenges: Information overload (15 petabytes per day and growing), shared complexity (both infrastructure and organizational), and the need to create more shared connections.

The Social Business Opportunity

The opportunity? Social businesses embrace networks of people to create business value, and there are a few key entry points: The need to deepen client relationships, to drive operational efficiencies, and to optimize the workforce.

We’ve all had to focus on getting leaner and meaner these past few years, to the first point.  But we can also get new products to market faster, and use the market as a listening and sounding board more effectively.

Most key to social business, we can optimize our workforce by finding ways to extract new value from an increasingly distributed workforce (think globalization), and to do so without impacting productivity (in fact, quite the opposite) and to help our people become more focused on innovation.

Rhodin then posed some provocative questions: What are consumers saying about your business?  Are you listening?  What about your employee’s digital reputations, which have never been more important?

Did you know 20% of the top search engine queries in the world were now going back to consumer generated content?

Is your organization applying social analytics practices to conduct sophisticated sentiment analysis that can help you understand not only your brand reputation but also help you improve your products?

Then, Rhodin put up a slide that I thought told the entire story in one sweeping motion: The transition from traditional, hierarchical enterprises transitioning to social synergistic ones consisting of vast numbers of communities and a culture of sharing and innovation, which will soon start to separate the leaders from the masses.

It was then that Rhodin introduced IBM senior vice president, Jon Iwata, whom I also had the pleasure to hear speak about IBM’s 100-year legacy last fall in Barcelona.

What’s Past Is Prologue: From “e-business” to “S-business”

Iwata provided another quick flashback, but this time to explain we’ve all been here before.  It was 1995, and IBM bought Lotus as the commercialization of the Internet was underway and everyone in the market was talking about browsers and content.

IBM, and then CEO Lou Gerstner, were talking about the potential impact on business, even though to many it appeared IBM had no real involvement with the Internet.

Quite the contrary, and as IBM introduced the idea of “e-business,” it soon became clear Gerstner and others were correct, and the impact on business and organizations around the globe since then has been profound.

We made a market.

And today, Iwata explained, we’ve got another opportunity to lead and to make a new market, and in the process to provide our companies with game-changing capabilities.

Two years ago, IBM started a global conversation about the next era of computing and its impact on society, the “smarter planet.”

We identified three broad trends there: 1) Instrument the world’s systems 2) Interconnect them 3) Make them intelligent

With this strategy, we could start to see for the first time what was happening in key infrastucture: Our energy grids, our supply chains, etc., and we could make them more sustainable and, in a word, smarter.

But, Iwata went on to explain we also saw all the ways people interact would also become smarter, from the interconnectedness using social software to the mobility new devices would bring.

Now, we could connect billions of people, use social analytics to analyze all this new data (including our connections to one another!), and tap into the core human reality that people are inherently social.

Sometimes we work socially in a public way (retail), sometimes in a private, secure way (banking), but we’re all social.

People Working Together Better

Hence, social business, like e-business, is an opportunity to transform the enterprise, the way we work, extract, and create value, and yes, the ways we interact with one another.

IBM’s proof point, Iwata pointed out, was “Generation Open,” our own internal software development community that allows IBMers to develop software of their own choosing, and the reputation monitoring and feedback included to motivate and reward those developers.

The results? Generation Open delivered 160,000 new projects last year, drove down development costs by one-third, and increased asset reuse by 4X.

Social business.

And that’s what IBM continues to deliver in its market communications: strong, tangible proof points of how social business can deliver real business outcomes.

Take social engagement, for example: There is lots of focus on internal collaboration and expertise sharing, but what about when you go outside the firewall.  You may want to designate certain teams to monitor the social media, or provide CRM.

Realistically, Iwata suggested, all of our employees will soon adopt social technologies if they haven’t already.

So, how can we help enable them?

At IBM, we recently launched an enablement program, named aptly enough, “Social Business @ IBM,” which helps increase the social acumen of 400,000+ IBMers, educating them on policies and guidelines, and also enabling them with tools that allows them to monitor their personal networks, participate in key social media vehicles, and the like.

We expect to educate 50,000 IBMers by the end of this year alone, explained Iwata.

This new type of change requires new systems of management and leadership.  Traditional vertical functions (sales and marketing, HR, etc.) will require more integration, driven by transparency and the need to have a single view of the customer.

Iwata began his close with a call to action: Those of you who are champions of social media will soon find yourselves becoming an integrating force in your organizations.

Be prepared to help the organization make this disruptive transition, and concurrently, think about how you can leverage secure, scalable technology (including that from IBM) combined with tangible business outcomes and responsible management practices to successfully navigate your way to the new world.

The time to act is now, concluded Iwata, and the way to act is together.

The Lotus Cloud Is Getting Bigger…

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…and Leon’s getting la-rrr-ggg-errrrr!

Sorry, still bemoaning the loss of Leslie Nielsen all these weeks later.

And with just three days left to Lotusphere, I’m in an “Airplane” kind of mood!

Scott Laningham and I have been tuning up our videocasting chops in pre-production preparing for all the video interviews we’re going to be conducting in Orlando (sorry, no Mickey), and we have a feast of IBM and Lotus executive and partner celebrities lined up.

To whet your appetite for all things Lotus, Scott and I synched up earlier this week for a pre-Lotusphere podcast. Scott spoke with Kathy Mandelstein and Colleen Hayes with the IBM Collaborations team for a sneak preview, and I added a few thoughts of my own about what I’d be looking forward to at Lotusphere 2011.

To keep the drumbeat going, we also announced some new partnerships and increased adoption of LotusLive public cloud services earlier today.

IBM announced partnerships with Ariba and SugarCRM to help clients take advantage of social commerce and CRM in the cloud.  We also announced the widespread adoption of LotusLive with a whole range of new clients benefiting from IBM’s cloud initiatives.

You can read more about both here.

Recent research from IDC demonstrates that worldwide spending on cloud services will grow almost threefold by 2013, to some $44.2 billion (U.S.).

And based on a survey IBM conducted in the mid-market recently, there’s growing adoption of cloud computing among midsize firms, with two-thirds either planning or currently deploying cloud-based technologies to improve IT systems while lowering their overall costs.

Adoption of cloud computing is on the rise. Recent IDC research shows that worldwide spending on cloud services will grow almost threefold, reaching $44.2 billion by 2013. With this increased interest and adoption, businesses across the world are embracing IBM’s public cloud services for easy-to-use collaboration tools to connect with colleagues, partners and suppliers quickly.

Additionally, according to a recent IBM survey of more than 2,000 midsize companies, there’s growing adoption of cloud computing among midsize firms, with two-thirds either planning or currently deploying cloud-based technologies to improve IT systems management while lowering costs.

Check out the video below to learn more about how Lotus and SugarCRM are bringing customer relationship management to the cloud, and, of course, keep an eye on the Turbo blog throughout Lotusphere as more news emerges.

Written by turbotodd

January 27, 2011 at 4:33 pm

Live @ Lotusphere Day 2.5 Podcast Recap: Speedgeekers Unite!

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Scott and I did a Tuesday/Wednesday Lotusphere 2010 recap yesterday morning, chatting about SpeedGeeking, the Blogger Briefing, our visit to the IBM Innovation Labs demos (which were incroyable), Wednesday’s key announcements, and the overall tenor of the event.

Click on the following to download the podcast: Live @ Lotusphere 2010: Day 2.5 Podcast Debrief: Speedgeekers Unite! (MP3, 11:25)

Written by turbotodd

January 21, 2010 at 2:49 pm

Live @ Lotusphere 2010: New Insights

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Scott Laningham and I were able to experience two very cool things over and just after lunch.

First, we sat down for a collaboration market overview with Carol Galvin, who is currently the principle segment analyst for IBM Market Insights, focusing on IBM Software and Lotus in particular. It was a far-reaching discussion which included great insights on the collaboration software market (including a segment breakdown and geo view), as well as some insights on the “consumeratization of IT.”

Keep your eyes peeled here in the Turbo blog and on Scott’s blog for that podcast soon.

Then, we had an opportunity to visit with the IBM Innovations Lab, where I saw several mind-blowing advancements in social data visualization, and some of the LotusLive Labs breakthroughs we heard about earlier in the week.

I wish I could just beam everyone here and do a walkthru (Can somebody bring back William Shatner!?), but Scott did some interviews there which we hope to have up later which will give you direct access to some of the insights we found there.

In terms of highlights, I saw the Shared Presentation experience, which would allow for real-time crowdsourcing of presentation building (No, give ME the mouse!), as well as an email/task in-box triage tool that’s about one of the coolest things I’ve seen in Orlando.

It’s predicated on David Allen’s “Getting Things Done” principles and allows you to quickly “triage” your in-box.  I’m praying Lotus will integrate that into the next version of Notes and Notes Traveler!

Things are slowly winding down here, but it looks as though there’s still plenty of traffic and plenty of folks to network with and learn from.

We’ll be here until the (almost) bitter end!

Click here if you’d like to see a rundown on the latest “Lotus” relevant news coming out of Lotusphere 2010.

Written by turbotodd

January 20, 2010 at 8:57 pm

Live @ Lotusphere, Day 3: Goin’ Mobile

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It’s Day  3 at Lotusphere, and my brain is slowly evolving into collaborative mush.

I had a great chat with some business partners from New Jersey over breakfast, who explained that they were Lotus faithful and had been coming to the event for over 10 years now.

They told me how they thought this was the FIRST year they’d been here where the event didn’t seem to revolve completely around the next release of Lotus Notes, and that there was a much broader view into the Lotus collaboration portfolio.

And, they seemed to be digging it.

Well, gents, I definitely don’t think that was a happy accident, but we very much appreciate the feedback and are glad you think we seem to be heading in the right direction.

As to this AM, let’s get to some breaking news coming out of the second floor of the Dolphin hotel press conference.

First, more news on the emerging IBM Lotus mobile strategy, which includes a major expansion of IBM Lotus Collaboration software and delivery of enterprise secure email for Android, the iPhone, and Nokia Symbian-based smartphones.

IBM customer General Motors related during the event this week how it’s building for an increasingly mobile workforce, connected and equipped for anything, anytime, anywhere.

Specifically, GM chief strategy and technology officer Kirk Guttman explained he has thousands of people on iPhones and BlackBerry devices using their Lotus collaboration tools while in motion, increasing their productivity while in motion…just not behind me while driving down the Interstate, please!

As mentioned the other day, the Lotus Notes Traveler Companion, a plug-in that allows you to view encrypted email on the iPhone.  Available in the Apple App store now.

Traveler will also be supported on Nokia Symbian smartphones and Windows Mobile devices, because we want to be sure Bill Gates and Ray Ozzie can securely read one another’s Lotus Notes email on their iPhones.

That was a joke!  Get it, Ray and Bill, Lotus Notes, iPhone!? (Well, let’s give Bill credit…he did apparently just get his own Twitter account after three years of critical Twittering mass).

Next up, we had some great news on the online meeting front, which is where, as you know, I spend most of my life.

In fact, I think I’m supposed to be in an emeeting right at this very moment!  Doh!

These new features in IBM Lotus Sametime offer a new online meeting experience that provides a consolidated calndar view and enables users to start or join a meeting with a single click…because taking a few clicks to open an emeeting was apparently a major labor on the part of IBMers and customers around the globe!

Just kidding…I love one click access, particularly to the delete button in my Notes mail inbox.

With this new feature, users are going to be able to easily invite participants to a meeting by dragging names from their IM contact list and dropping them into the meeting.

Participants will also be able to accept meeting invites with a single click as well as upload materials to the meeting with a drag and drop capability.

I presume this also means I can drop you OUT of the meeting if you’re misbehaving.

IBM Lotus has had a number of world class companies participating in a beta to test out these new capabilities.

Thomas Eidenmueller with Merck KGaAsaid that “With our planned deployment of Lotus Sametime 8.5 in the second quarter of 2010, we will be able to further lower travel expenses with our plans to run education sessions both internally and externally with our partners.”

Other new features of Sametime 8.5 worth highlighting: Always-ready, reservation-less meetings with password-protected meeting rooms…a zero-download Web client that makes it easier for companies to embed Sametime capabilities into their apps and Web sites…a new browser-based Apple iPhone chat client, for all you Macheads out there…and enhancements to the Sametime Unified Telephony capability, which helps users better manage their phone calls based on presence and location.

That one’s a no brainer for companies that have an exceptionally mobile workforce, and I’ve used that function when I was working remotely and didn’t want to run up a big phone bill from overseas.

Have wifi and Sametime Unified Telelphony, will travel.

Finally, for those of you on the small and medium sized business front, IBM announced today that it’s working with business partners to create solutions integrated with IBM Lotus Foundations to help small and medium business address the challenge of complexity.

Lotus Foundations is IBM’s hardware and software solution that helps SMBs collaborate with tools that include email, office apps, file sharing, and backup/data recovery and protection.

Lotus Foundations basically provides a one-stop shop for smaller businesses that want to focus on running their business (and not their IT infrastructure), and because the Foundations solution is autonomic, you can install, setup, monitor, and do problem resolution without human intervention.

Speaking of human intervention, I need to intervene with myself and cut off this post.  That’s it, that’s a wrap, and I think that’s the fastest I’ve ever typed in my life…and I’m a fast typist (they don’t call me Turbo for nothin’).

More to come later today, including our podcast interview with IBMer Rawn Shah, author of “Social Networking for Business.”

In the meantime, I encourage you to read this thoughtful post from ReadWriteWeb’s Alex Williams about IBM vs. Microsoft’s approach to the open Web.

Written by turbotodd

January 20, 2010 at 4:08 pm

Live @ Lotusphere 2010, Day Two: Making Lotus Connections

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Another session I attended earlier today (and a debrief promised from an earlier post) revolved around the Lotus Connections platform.

Sure, I’m biased, I work for Big Blue, but let me just say that before I get into the specifics, I’m a regular user of the Lotus Connections product by design.

IBM is definitely walking its own talk in this particular arena, and I can personally attest to the way it has changed the way I (and my extended global team) work.

For example, I run a weekly Web team call that has been continuous for going on six years now.  Every Friday, 10 AM CST, sharp (except when I’m on a jet plane to nowhere).

I used to manage the communications for the call entirely through Lotus Notes, and while I’m a Notes fan as well, Connections has helped ease the pain of managing that call.

For example, I’ve asked all 70+ regular participants to go and “Join” the community I set up for the call in Connections, so now instead of having to manage an access control list, I’m crowdsourcing the subscription list.

You want to have access to information about the call (including call-in #s and the weekly Symphony presentation), then you simply join and you’re automagically emailed the info as soon as I send it out.

Talk about a time saver and productivity enhancer.

I’ve also used the Connections community for this particular call to share important industry news, and embedded several helpful RSS feeds so the group can follow some other important info threads.

We also have a discussion group there to discuss issues of importance to our global Software Web community, and the email function lets me easily send out dispatches to the global team no matter where in the world I am.

The SWG Web Marketing Community also allows me to take advantage of the blogging feature, so that I can share info about coming calls and anecdotes worthy of the community’s attention.

Finally, I share all my presentations from each week in the “Files” service, so that anybody can go back in time and download an earlier presentation should they be interested in reading more about that week’s given topic/call.

All of this in a single community, and all powered by Lotus Connections.

Testify, Turbo, testify!

In terms of today’s informative update, Suzanne Livingston and team shared insights about IBM’s own wider adoption of Connections, which will ultimately replace the IBM Bluepages directory.

She explained that social collaboration’s mission is simple: Lotus Connections is social software for business that is focused on people based collaboration that empowers you with the collective knowledge of your organization, your partners and your customers, and helps people build better outcomes.

Got that?  Good, ’cause there will be a quiz later.

For organizations needing to cut costs and provide for workforce flexibility, all while helping leverage collective organizational expertise and communicating with employees as individuals, Lotus Connections 2.5 fits the bill.

Need more insight?  The right info at the right time in the right context, and all while magnifying the value of your content?

Lotus Connections 2.5 fits the bill.

Need an advantage by leveraging your innovation across your full value chain, all while improving the strength and speed of making connections and depth of relationships?

All together now.

Okay, enough Kum Ba Ya and instead some details about the new version of Lotus Connections:

Improvements to Communities

Communities can be enhanced with additional tools: communitiy activities, blogs, files, and wikis. Community discussion forums have a new look and now show the number of replies for each topic; community owners can customize the look of their community and move widgets around on the community’s home page.

Wikis

Wikis let you create sites to collaboratively author and share documents. Built-in revision history makes it a snap to roll back to previous versions.

Files
Files makes sharing files with other people a snap, and reduces inbox bloat.

Mobile access

Support for mobile browser to Lotus Connections Profiles from Apple iPhones or Nokia s60 devices.

Federated Updates

The Connections home page has a new Updates tab that lets you see news items relevant to you from across your social network. Use the “discover” tab to easily browse content from across all of connections.

Microblogging

Profiles now features status updates and a profile “board” that lets you easily post messages to other users’ profiles. Go to the profiles home page to see a list of status updates for all the people in your social network. Discover profiles by expertise with the organization-wide tag cloud.

Improved Search

Easily search all connections applications, and filter by tags, person, or time range.

Activities & Blogs feature Community Integration

Tired of adding the same people to an activity or blog in order to share it with them? Use a community to start group-centric activities or blogs.

Visit here to learn how you can better connect your organization with Lotus Connections 2.5.

Written by turbotodd

January 19, 2010 at 10:42 pm

Live @ Lotusphere 2010: Day 1 Wrap-up Podcast

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Scott Laningham and I met late yesterday afternoon to compare notes and record a recap what we learned at Day 1 of Lotusphere.

You can download the podcast here (MP3, 18:04).

In this podcast, we hit on what we thought were some of the highlights of the very informative first day and also recapped all the key Lotus announcements.

Written by turbotodd

January 19, 2010 at 9:54 pm

IBM VP Gina Poole on Social Software: Podcast Coming Soon

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It’s just a little after half past noon on Monday.

developerWorks podcast guru Scott Laningham and I had the opportunity to sit down and speak with Gina Poole, VP, Marketing 2.0 with IBM Software Group, after the exciting opening session this AM.

Gina, whose team I support at IBM, went deep on several topics relevant to Lotusphere, expounding on marketing via the social media, the adoption of social software in the enterprise, and much more.

Keep an eye tuned for that podcast…I’ll link to it just as soon as Scott’s finished producing it!

There’s LOADS of activity on the Lotusphere Twitter stream, so if you’re not keeping an eye on hashtags #lotusknows and #ls10, it’s time to start.

In just a short while, we’ll be off to hear the infamous Ed Brill catch us up on what Lotus Knows about the state of Lotus Notes.

Written by turbotodd

January 18, 2010 at 5:44 pm

Lotusphere 2010: Day 1 Announcements

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At the press conference this morning here in Orlando, IBM made a number of key announcements relative to the collaboration space.

A couple were mentioned in my prior post, but let me quickly break down all of them now that they’ve been made public:

  1. Acceleration of Cloud Computing with LotusLive
  2. Collaboration Agenda Announcement
  3. Project Vulcan (Blueprint for the future of collaboration)
  4. IBM and RIM Enterprise Collaboration and Social Networking
  5. Availability of IBM Client for Smart Work in India (via Business Partners)

I already addressed a couple of these via Mr. Picciano’s keynote, so now it’s time for a little depth on the others.

The LotusLive announcement involves both the technology and business expansion of the LotusLive cloud collaboration pipeline through a new R&D pipeline from IBM Research.

IBM also plans to open the LotusLive suite to new partners, and the services will provide integrated email, Web conferencing, social networking, and collaboration with IBM’s focus on security, reliability and enterprise integration.

A number of the fruits from this new R&D effort will be unveiled this week, including the following:

  • Slide Library, a collaborative way to build and share presentations (I can hear a collective ‘Amen’ across IBM marketing on this one)
  • Collaborative Recorded Meetings, a service that records and instantly transcribes meeting presentations and audio/video for searching and tagging
  • Event Maps, an interactive way to visualize and interact with conference schedules
  • Composer, the ability to create LotusLive Mashups through the combination of LotusLive services.

Also expected in 2Q10, Project Concord, a new Web-based document editor for creating and sharing documents, presentations and spreadsheets.

On the LotusLive Notes version upgrade, IBM will provide email, calendar, contact management, and IM capabilities to customers in a multi-tenant environment.

New services and options here will result in a reduction in the minimum number of users for a LotusLive Notes subscription from 1,000 to 25, IBM Lotus Sametime IM support, and a 5G standard mailbox quota.

IBM is now accepting requests to participate in the LotusLive Notes managed beta program here.

Written by turbotodd

January 18, 2010 at 4:20 pm

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