Turbotodd

Ruminations on tech, the digital media, and some golf thrown in for good measure.

Posts Tagged ‘integrated service management

Security By Design

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My last post was about security.

This post is going to be about security.

The last post covered IBM’s recent X-Force Trends report which reported on the lingering and expanding security threats faced by organizations around the globe.

This post will address some of the antidotes IBM announced just yesterday at the RSA Conference in San Francisco.

In San Francisco, IBM detailed a number of new IBM Security Solutions, research initiatives, partnerships and client results aimed at meeting the rising demand by businesses and governments worldwide to secure digital and physical infrastructures.

Security, by Design

In my recent coverage of the IBM Pulse 2010 conference, I covered a session by IBM Chief Privacy Officer Harriet Pearson in which Harriet introduced the idea of “security by design.”

This approach stems from recognition of the fact that new computing paradigms and business models fundamentally require businesses to rethink how they deal with compliance, risk management and data protection.  Central to IBM’s approach to addressing clients’ security challenges is a shift in focus from securing assets to securing critical services.

With integrated service management – tools that provide can provide a “command center” view into a client’s operations and potential areas of risk — IBM can help its clients design security into the fabric of the services they deliver, making security intrinsic to their business processes, product development and daily operations.

Yesterday’s announcements, based on IBM’s experience with hundreds of global clients and businesses, are designed to further expand on the vision that security, by design, is an enabler of innovative change.

IBM is introducing new software, systems and services to help global organizations securely adopt new forms of technology like cloud computing and new business models like telework, while addressing emerging compliance constructs.

New IBM Security Solutions include:

  • IBM Secure Web Gateway Service 2.0 IBM X-Force research indicates a dramatic rise in the number and complexity of Web application attacks. This new service enables greater protection against Web-based threats and enforcement of corporate IT policies while lowering overall management costs.
  • IBM Managed Firewall Service and IBM Unified Threat Management Service – this new bundled offering allows clients to use select Check Point firewall and unified threat management devices while receiving IBM Managed Security Services for those devices for a monthly fee. This provides clients increased levels of protection without the burden of upfront capital expenditures for the devices.
  • IBM Security Information and Event Manager 2.0 – this updated software helps to reduce costs by automating enterprise log management and central management, reduce insider threats and protect integrity by monitoring and auditing privileged user activities, and facilitate compliance efforts and streamline management with compliance management modules.
  • IBM Security Content Analysis Software Development Kit (SDK) rapid growth of the Internet and the constant onslaught of spam requires advanced filtering technology that is expensive to develop and maintain. This new SDK provides developers with up-to-date filter database and accurate analysis — along with an easy-to-implement application programming interface (API).
  • IBM AppScan Source Edition – as organizations continue to develop and design products and services that are increasingly interconnected, they are also placing increased emphasis on securing the software that powers these products and services. This new edition of IBM Rational AppScan Source Edition AppScan can scan software source code and identify potential security and compliance vulnerabilities during the earliest stages of software development, when they are less expensive to correct.
  • IBM Lotus Protector for Mail Encryption – for secure collaboration and communication, IBM is announcing a new software product called IBM Lotus Protector for Mail Encryption. Available in April, it extends IBM’s flagship messaging software, offering Lotus Notes’ native e-mail encryption feature to include any address accessible on the Internet — irrespective of e-mail system or client used by the recipient.  IBM Protector for Mail Encryption addresses the Internet encryption challenge, in a simple and integrated way, unlike third-party “bolt-on” products that have historically been complex and expensive to deploy.
  • IBM Security Privileged Identity Management and Compliance Solution – rising trend from attackers to use privileged user identities to gain access to core systems, increasing compliance mandates and high administrative costs all add to the difficulty of managing users and identities and blocking against internal and external threats.  This combined solution provides threat prevention, identity management and meeting compliance needs through file integrity monitoring, separation of duties, role hierarchy, and intrusion prevention.
  • IBM z/OS V1.12 – With the latest release of z/OS, IBM helps clients promote improved operations, availability, manageability, and security through self-learning, self-managing, and self-optimization capabilities. z/OS security functions, such as data encryption, encryption key management, digital certificates, password synchronization, and centralized authentication and auditing, can be deployed as part of enterprise-wide security solutions and can help mitigate risk and reduce compliance costs.

Institute for Advanced Security

In February 2010, IBM, the Security & Defence Agenda (SDA) and a coalition of international think tanks hosted almost 4,000 global experts from government, industry, academia, non-government organizations (NGOs) in a virtual dialogue on the world’s greatest security challenges.

Cybersecurity was identified as a significant potential threat to international peace and stability, and a number of experts called for the creation of a cybersecurity agency to increase public and private sector collaboration and educate global leaders on cyber issues.

In order to address such concerns, the company is launching the IBM Institute for Advanced Security to help clients, academics, partners and other businesses more easily understand, address and mitigate the issues associated with securing cyberspace.

The Institute will collaborate with public and private sector officials in Washington, D.C., and provide access to a wide range of resources to help the government more efficiently and effectively secure and protect critical information threatened by increasingly malicious and costly cyber threats.

As part of this effort, IBM is bringing to bear expertise from its software, services, systems and research arms to help governments and businesses around the world safeguard themselves from new and existing threats.

For instance, the U.S. Air Force recently selected IBM to design and demonstrate a highly secure cloud computing infrastructure that can support defense and intelligence networks.

The IBM Institute for Advanced Security will provide a collaborative setting for public and private sector officials to tap IBM’s vast security expertise so they can more efficiently and effectively secure and protect critical systems and information threatened by increasingly malicious and costly cyber threats.

IBM’s approach will help public and private organizations avoid the trend of adding security on after the fact by providing them the education, expertise and resources  to design security into the foundation of their infrastructures.

IBM Tivoli general manager Al Zollar spoke at yesterday’s RSA conference.  His keynote presentation is now available via podcast, in which Zollar addressed “The Decade of Smart Security.”

Written by turbotodd

March 3, 2010 at 3:41 pm

Live @ Pulse 2010: Second Day Buzz

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Greetings from 5:47 A.M. Las Vegas time, live in my room at the MGM Signature.

Yesterday was a great start to Pulse 2010, I must say.  There was quite a buzz in the air, and even though I was stuck in the MGM “biosphere” for the entirety of the day, I found the content of the opening session and Al Gore’s keynote to be quite compelling.

And the demo of The Venetian and its “smart” city-within-a-city was particularly compelling, and judging from the Twitter comments I saw, you all in the audience really enjoyed it as well.  If you wish to show the demo to your colleagues back at the office, you can view it here on YouTube.

As part of yesterday’s festivities, IBM made some key announcements, including around the notion of building smarter buildings.

As I already posted, IBM has partnered with Johnson Controls to optimize energy usage and improve security for clients in more than 150 countries.  This new smart building solution will help clients improve asset performance, sustainability, productivity, and safety across buildings and portfolios of buildings.

“Smarter buildings are key to the economic and environmental sustainability of urban environments,” said Rich Lechner, vice president, Energy and Environment for IBM, about the announcement. “Real-time infrastructure data coupled with analytics can enable better economic decisions and environmental outcomes. Together with an array of partners, we are delivering this value to clients today.”

IBM also announced it is working with Ricoh on an advanced device and printing management system which infuses office devices with real-time tracking and monitoring to help firms significantly reduce their print-related costs, improve service and also cut back on carbon emissions.

Gartner has estimated organizations can save between 10 and 30 percent of their printing costs if they better manage their printer, copier, and fax fleets.

You can keep up with all the Pulse-related announcements on this page here.

As for getting Tuesday off to a similarly roaring start, don’t forget this morning’s keynote session will be co-hosted by IBM Chief Privacy Officer and VP, Security Counsel, Harriet Pearson, and IBM System and Technology Group GM Helene Armitage.

Harriet and Helene will explore how integrated service management can meet the needs of a smarter planet, with a particular eye on the practical concerns of managing growth, reducing costs and ensuring security.

See you at the MGM Grand Arena!

Written by turbotodd

February 23, 2010 at 3:40 pm

Live @ IBM Pulse 2010: Integrated Service Management

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Before we heard earlier today from Al Gore, we heard from that other Al, Tivoli’s own Al Zollar, the general manager of Tivoli software for IBM, on the subject of integrated service management.

Al Zollar took the stage bright and early to explain what’s going on in the external environment, that signs of the smarter planet are all around us, and that they have the potential to change the way people, business, and processes operate, and how Tivoli is working to optimize the world’s infrastructure — physical and digital — so we can all live and work smarter, not harder.

Al talked about the proliferation we’re seeing, of instrumented, interconnected, and intelligent devices, and how we’re helping deliver innovative services we couldn’t have dreamt of ten short years ago.

Here’s what we’ve learned thus far, according to Al: That you all (our customers) are dealing with amazing levels of complexity growing due to the new devices and services being added each day.

Of the skyrocketing number of security threats that you all deal with every single day.

And that yet, with the lack of integration of yesterday’s tools and processes, many organizations are not able to “see” and manage it all effectively.

As Al observed, “You can’t effectively manage with an Excel spreadsheet.”

The sheer volume of dependencies is absurd, and a single transaction can yet now cross multiple application domains.  Any change in one of these in such an environment can wreak havoc.

Just a single change can have up to 1 billion permutations.  Now THAT is complexity.

Al then launched into a number of Tivoli case studies.  The Capitol Region of Denmark, for example, whose countless backup requirements for each hospital it supports can range to massive amounts of data duplication distributed across three different storage sites and over 1.5 petabytes of information.

They were able to overcome their storage management challenges with only 4 people and an integrated service management portfolio from IBM Software.

Or the U.S. Air Force, which has 100 bases and 700,000 military personnel around the world, and where “mission critical” takes on a whole new meaning.

The Air Force is leveraging ISM in a cloud environment from IBM to help overcome its challenges.

Service lifecycle management and dashboards; unified management of service requests and incidents; asset management; and automated management, all are what’s needed to reduce complexity in today’s smarter planet, all through three single core concepts: Visibility, control, and automation.

To help matters, IBM today announced that its Energy and Utilities Centers in LaGaude, France, and Austin, Texas, were now open for business — if you can lock down the grid, you can lock down just about any connected infrastructure.

Zollar then introduced new releases of several key products, including Tivoli Provisioning Manager for Images; IBM Information Archive; Tivoli Security Information and Event Manager; Tivoli Storage Manager; and Fastback Solutions.

He also announced new partnerships with Ricoh, Johnson Controls, and Juniper Networks.

Rational Software GM Danny Sabbah then took the stage to observe the role design and delivery has played in the ongoing evolution of the American automobile.

In 1977, Sabbah observed, the Oldsmobile Toronado had a single computer unit for spark plug timing.

Today, a car is more like 30 computer on wheels, with 100 million lines of code and with more software than the complex controls used on the retiring U.S. Space Shuttle!

The car as data center on wheels.

Sabbah suggested we must stop this madness that development, deployment and operations are separate and distinct processes.

He also said that the Looming Business Crisis demands linkage, that we need to drive fundamental change in design and delivery in order to be able to achieve the goal of ISM.  Because when critical services and applications “go down or slow down,” they cost time, money, and, ultimately, customer loyalty.

Finally, Laura Sanders and Mike Rhodin brought things to a close with a compelling case study featuring The Venetian hotel’s “smarter city within a city” demonstration, and a look at the industry frameworks IBM Software is putting in place to put ISM in the context that matters most, the business of your business.

Ultimately, businesses and organizations can’t just be content with optimization: They must innovate.

We’ll be sure to hear more about this innovation over the next couple of days.

Al Gore’s Smarter (and Funnier!) Planet

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Never mind your political sentiments about Al Gore the politician, what you may not know about “the former next president of the United States,” as he jokingly refers to himself, is that the former U.S. vice president is very, very funny.

Really! Would I kid about something so serious as a former vice president?

In his keynote at this morning’s IBM Pulse 2010 opening session, Gore made me laugh so hard I wanted to cry…not only because of his very folksy yet hilarious delivery, but also due to the severity and great consequences of his important message.

Before you think I’m about to step up onto my soapbox, know that Gore was very cautious not to step up onto his in today’s keynote.

He knew that by coming to an IBM conference to speak to a very business-friendly audience, that he was potentially walking into enemy territory — despite the enormous sum I suspect we paid him to come and speak.

Gore walked into the room of 5,000+ at the MGM Grand Arena with eyes wide open, and with a sobering message that presented as much a cheerleading challenge to global business as an indictment of existing short-term inclined business practices or climate abuse.

Al Gore Speaks at IBM Pulse Event

Al Gore Speaks at IBM Pulse opening session in Las Vegas, February 22, 2010

The former vice president asserted that the climate crisis did not exist in a vacuum, and like any interconnected system, was joined at a nexus of two other key crises, one economic and involving our recent collective business philandering, the other one national security-related, with the ongoing U.S. role in continuing to buy cheap oil despite the long-term moral consequences.

“As long as we are so vulnerable to expensive energy resources in foreign countries that are not among the most stabile or friendly to us, there will be a national security threat associated with that,” Gore warned, the that being the notion of sending hundreds of billions of dollars every year to those unfriendly foreign countries, then backstopping those petro dollars with American military might.

He also noted that we’re putting 90M tons of CO2 every day into a thin sheath of atmosphere that you or I could drive to (if we could drive straight up) in a matter of minutes, and that the vast majority of the existing heat as a result was being reformulated into our oceans.

But let’s assume you’re just not hip to Gore’s whole climate warming message.

That’s cool (is it getting warmer in here?), but still and all you can’t deny the economic consequences of being dependent on that foreign energy: Every time we see a sudden increase in prices, we see an economic shockwave, investments suddenly dissipate, and we lose valuable time and have to start the cycle all over again with the next petroleum price increase.

So what’s a wandering, unemployed, itinerant, environmentalist ex-American vice president suggest that we do?

Gore alleges that all these things are connected by a common thread, and that if you pull the thread hard enough, you hold at least part of the answer in your hand: A shift to renewable sources of energy, natch; reduced carbon emissions, controversial though it is; but most importantly of all, a new reliance on efficiency.

Said Gore, “We are in the presence of one of the greatest opportunities in the history of business to become much more efficient and eliminate waste, pollution, and losses all at the same time.”

You’ll note that Gore said in the history of business, not in the history of the world.  Methinks that was most intentional.

Even if you don’t buy into the evidence of the climate crisis, efficiency is by all odds the most productive business strategy around, and to that point, Gore himself came out and said that IBM’s smarter planet campaign “just feels right to me.”

I could envision IBM marketing executives across the company salivating (or perhaps cursing?) the implied endorsement.

Nevertheless, with great opportunity comes great responsibility.

Gore explained that the “hinge of history is swinging,” that with all this talk about complexity and complex systems at the Pulse conference, the audience needs to understand that our entire global civilization was going through a very challenging reorganization, leaving business, governments, even individuals around the world trying to figure out where they land in the great reorganization of 2010.

Alas, there’s no org chart that can explain that one, but Gore did explain there are natural places to start, that, for example, we’re extremely wasteful in the way that we use energy in buildings and cities — here in the US about 40% of all the CO2 emissions comes from buildings, another set of legacy technologies we’ve used a little too long.

So how to address these challenges and not instead disappear into the Nevada desert crying out in hopeless hysterics?

Well, we can start by getting better and more relevant information (using technology and the like), and that when there are important factors that are systematically ignored, to use that “better” information to make our own choices.

That, in fact, we all have an opportunity to get all the information relevant to decisions we make everyday in this challenging environment, and to the “pulse” of the conference theme, to automate some of those decisions so that we can free up the RPMs to focus clearly on the Key Major Decisions and be able to better see how they relate to one another.

“If you analyze the human brain as the same terms for computers,” Gore explained, “we have a low bitrate and very high resolution. In making decisions about vast amounts of data, if you try to do it bit by bit, you’ll never succeed.

“But if you can portray the context of all that info, that is a good strategy, whether in healthcare, or city management, or whatever, it is really important to get a clear view of where it’s going.”

Gore went on to say that “using the right kind of information, software, hardware, is your most powerful set of tools in your toolset,” and that this time around, business is leading the way, and that governments have not stepped up to the plate on this (with a few exceptions).

Finally, Gore used more cornpone charm to explain his reaction to the outcome of last December’s climate negotiations in Copenhagen: “I feel fine.”

Explaining, it’s kind of like the old farmer who, upon hauling a big cow to market in the back up of the pickup truck has a bad traffic accident, only to have the highway patrolman come along and shoot the injured cow right between the eyes to put the poor thing out of his misery, whereupon the farmer responds to the question from the same said patrolman when asked how he (the farmer) feels, and as he looks over at the cow explains: “I feel fine.”

The role of business in providing essential leadership is more important than ever, Gore started to wind down, asking us to remember that this is one of those moments in history where “it’s difficult to imagine the scale and scope of the changes that lie ahead of us.”

But imagine it we must.

Gore closed by citing that old African proverb, which was simplistic in its essence, but again concise in its expressed urgency:

If you want to go quickly, go alone.

If you want to go far, go together.

Concluded the former next president of these United States, “We must go far, quickly.”

Written by turbotodd

February 22, 2010 at 8:15 pm

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