Turbotodd

Ruminations on tech, the digital media, and some golf thrown in for good measure.

Posts Tagged ‘flash

IBM Transforms FlashSystem, Drives Down Cost of Data

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IBM today announced sweeping advances in its all-flash storage solutions and software to drive down the costs of data and extend its solutions for hybrid and private cloud environments.

Some of the changes and additions include:

  • New ultra-dense FlashSystem array capable of storing more data in the same footprint, contributes to lower data capacity costs by nearly 60 percent.
  • New Spectrum Virtualize software allows simplified migration and disaster recovery of data to and from the IBM Public Cloud;
  • New software enables IBM and non-IBM storage to be used with popular Docker and Kubernetes containers environments;
  • Cloud-based software beta program integrates storage with artificial intelligence and machine learning through new software to collect inventory and diagnostic information in order to help optimize the performance, capacity and health of clients’ storage infrastructure.

“Companies are seeking guidance in modernizing their data from being a passive cost center to being the central hub for their business. IBM understands that only those that extensively analyze and exploit their data will benefit from it,” said Ed Walsh, GM, IBM Storage and SDI. “To help clients make this transformation, we are introducing new all-flash solutions that will dramatically lower the cost of storage systems while making data availability – whether on-site or in the cloud – a central part of their business strategy.”

In addition to the aforementioned features, updates to IBM Storage systems and software include:

  • New Platform Speeds Private Cloud Deployments – IBM Spectrum Access solutions offer what storage admins users need to deploy a private cloud quickly and efficiently, delivering the economics and simplicity of the cloud with accessibility, virtualization and performance of an on-premises implementation;
  • Consumption-Based Pricing – new utility offering enables a consumption-based buying model for hybrid cloud environments leveraging most of the IBM storage and VersaStack portfolios for users preferring to buy storage as an operating expense;
  • Consolidated User Interface – new interface for FlashSystem 900 consolidates activity and performance information in a single dashboard. Consistent with user interfaces used in other IBM storage systems and IBM Spectrum Storage software, the UI simplifies operations and helps improve productivity;
  • VersaStack with FlashSystem – incorporating the newest FlashSystem being announced today an extensive refresh to the IBM/Cisco VersaStack converged infrastructure offerings;
  • Investment Protection – several of the new all-flash storage and VersaStack solutions announced today are NVMe ready, enabling them to take advantage of the NVMe offerings coming in 2018.

“With this announcement, IBM is demonstrating, among other things, how highly leveraged their FlashCore strategy is,” said Eric Burgener, Research Director for Storage at IDC.  “Next generation FlashCore enhancements, including higher density 3D TLC NAND-based media and hardware-assisted in-line compression and encryption, immediately improve the capabilities of multiple IBM All Flash Arrays by providing features that drive higher infrastructure density and improved security more cost-effectively.”

IBM leadership in storage systems and software is based upon more than 380 system patents, including IBM FlashCore technology and more than 700 patents for IBM Spectrum Storage software. As a result IBM’s flash arrays have been ranked as Leader in Gartner Magic Quadrant for Solid State Arrays for four years in a row and for the 3rd year in a row has been named the #1 Software-Defined Storage vendor by IDC.

The new features to IBM’s all-flash systems and IBM Spectrum Storage software will be available in Q4. Clients interested in participating in the IBM beta program for cognitive support can inquire by visiting ibm.biz/FoundationPilot.

For more information about IBM Flash Storage please visit: https://www.ibm.com/storage/flash.

Written by turbotodd

October 26, 2017 at 9:12 am

Flash In The Pan

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I started reading Walter Isaacson’s biography of Steve Jobs the other day.

No, I’m not reading it on the iPad.  This one, I picked up the actual pulp edition. The weight of the book (it’s some 600+ pages) feels suited to the task of conveying Jobs’ complicated and complex and marvelous life.

And after Adobe’s announcement yesterday that Adobe would no longer use Flash for the browser programs used for smartphones and tablets, you could hear Jobs laughing from his grave.

Surely you remember when Jobs purposely prevented Flash from working on iPhones and iPads — I certainly couldn’t forget, as I have both devices, and the Flash gap on the iPad became obvious very quick.

But there was a lot of history behind this strategy, and Jobs had a long memory. In the book, he recounts the story of asking Adobe to make a Mac version of Premiere back in 1999, and Adobe refused.

Jobs was more than ever convinced he needed to build a strategy that would allow him to tie the hardware and software together, and control the entire ecosystem.

The next thing you know, we had the iPod, iTunes, the iTunes store, the iPhone, the iPad…you get the picture.

But Adobe’s sudden detour, in which they announced they’re instead going to embrace HTML5, could signal a new kind of platform war, one led by programming excellence rather than proprietary regimes.

As more and more of the once open-standards Web starts to see the return of walled (or, at least, semi-walled) gardens, it’s refreshing to see an expanded embrace of HTML5. I believe this will drive innovation and force the mobile and web experiences to compete on usability, merit, and utility, as opposed to plug-in dominance and proprietary lock-in battles.

Of course, there are significant economic benefits this move as well, as Adobe can help its clients develop once to run applications across multiple platforms, eliminating the need for costly platform adjustments and tuning, and freeing up time and energy to focus on innovation.

It’s too bad Steve Jobs wasn’t around to witness this firsthand.

But something tells me he would probably have approved…even if might have done so wearing a big, wide smirk on his face.

Written by turbotodd

November 10, 2011 at 3:43 pm

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