Turbotodd

Ruminations on tech, the digital media, and some golf thrown in for good measure.

Posts Tagged ‘artificial intelligence

But Is It Art?

leave a comment »

I think we’re about to jump the AI shark. And that’s before the shark has hardly even started to begun to swim.

A new work of art entitled “Portrait of Edmond de Belamy” is going on sale at Christie’s tonight, and according to a report by Quartzy, at first glance it appears to look like the handiwork of a long-dead Old Master.

Quartzy reports that it has a few smudges, a lightness in the brush strokes, some negative space at the edge of the canvas, and even a subtle chiaroscuro.

But, in fact, the picture of a man in a black shirt is not the work of any painter, living or dead.

No, it’s the result of an artificial intelligence algorithm.

“Portrait of Edmond De Belamy” will be the first algorithm – made artwork to go on auction in the world of fine art.

So how was the painting produced?

The humans behind the AI, a Parisian art collective called “Obvious,” first fed 15,000 images of paintings from between the 14th and 20th centuries into an open-source generative adversarial network, or “GAN”: 

This sort of neural network works in two parts: one generates the picture using the data available, and the other “discriminates,” essentially telling it whether it’s done a good job or whether the finished images are still obviously the work of a machine. It’s not clear exactly how many images the network shored up on the screen in total, but this is the one that won out. Obvious members then printed it on canvas, framed in gilt—and put it up for sale.

Will anybody buy it?

Quartzy reports that Christie’s is banking on somebody biting, probably with a final sale price of between $7,000 to $10,000?

No word yet whether or not the first AI-produced painting will shed itself after the sale, but knowing the arrogance of those AI algorithms, there’s a good stance it will instead attempt to replicate itself.

Written by turbotodd

October 25, 2018 at 9:39 am

A $1B AI School

leave a comment »

Happy Tuesday. It’s still raining here in Austin, and about 80 miles west of us the Llano River has reached a 40-foot flood stage. Please stop the rain, at least for a little while. We’ve had enough.

If you need a ride away from the floods, or were simply wondering what’s been going on with Uber, The Wall Street Journal is reporting that the company could be valued at 120 billion dollars in an IPO as early as 2019, which would nearly double its valuation from just two months ago.

As the Journal story points out, that “eye-popping” figure would make Uber worth more than General Motors, Ford Motor, and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles combined.

While Uber is focused on making smarter car rides, Paperspace has scored $13 million in investment for its AI-fueled application development platform.

According to a report from TechCrunch, Paperspace wants to help developers build AI and machine learning apps with a software and hardware development platform powered by GPUs and other powerful chips.

Last spring, the company released gradient, a serverless tool to make it easier to deploy and manage Ai and machine learning workloads.

By making Gradient a serverless management tool, customers don’t have to think about the underlying infrastructure. Instead, Paperspace handles all of that for them providing the resources as needed. “We do a lot of GPU compute, but the big focus right now and really where the investors are buying into with this fundraise, is the idea that we are in a really unique position to build out a software layer and abstract a lot of that infrastructure away [for our customers].

In other news, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology announced yesterday it was creating a new college focused on better preparing students to adapt to the increasingly disruptive AI wave through a planned $1 billion investment, $350 million of which came from private equity guru Stephen Schwarzman.

According to a report in The New York Times:

Mr. Schwarzman said he hoped that the M.I.T. move might trigger others to invest in America’s A.I. future, not just commercially. He points to the major push the Chinese government is making, and notes the fruits of United States government-funded research in the past — technologies that helped America take the global lead in industries from the personal computer to the internet.

Just last month, IBM and MIT announced a 10-year, 240 million dollar investment to create the MIT-IBM Watson AI lab, which will carry out fundamental AI research and seek to propel scientific breakthroughs than unlock the potential of AI.

Written by turbotodd

October 16, 2018 at 12:10 pm

Explaining AI Decisions

leave a comment »

IBM’s Institue of Business Value recently issued a new report concerning the implementation of AI, and according to a survey of 5,000 executives, discovered that 60 percent of those polled said they were concerned about being able to explain how AI is using data and making decisions in order to meet regulatory and compliance standards.

According to a story in The Wall Street Journal, there’s concern that:

AI decisions can sometimes be black boxes both for the data scientist engineering them and the business executives telling their benefits. This is especially true in deep learning tools such as neural networks that are used to identify patterns in data, whose structure roughly tries to mimic the operations of the human brain.

But just as in high school geometry, the question arises as to how to demonstrate one has proved their work. That is to say, to reveal how the AI system arrived at a specific conclusion.

The Journal identifies measures IBM took last week which include cloud-based tools that can show users which factors led to an AI-based recommendations. 

The tools can also analyze AI decisions in real-time to identify inherent bias and recommend data and methods to address that bias. The tools work with IBM’s AI services and those from other cloud services providers including Google, said David Kenny, senior vice president of cognitive solutions at IBM.

You can learn more about those measures in this blog post.

Written by turbotodd

September 27, 2018 at 12:13 pm

Automation Feast or Famine

leave a comment »

Happy Wednesday. 

Now that we’ve gotten that whole new iPhone analysis thing out of the way, let’s get back to the smart stuff.

The Wall Street Journal CIO Journal’s “Morning Download” email has been a must read for me for a couple of years now, and they do a generally good job of keeping their fingers on the pulse of enterprise IT, software, etc.

In today’s edition, they cited a new report from the World Economic Forum report on the jobs impact of artificial intelligence between now and 2022.

The report suggested that 984,000 jobs would disappear, but that 1.74 million new jobs would be created. 

The survey was of chief HR officers and top strategy execs from 300 global companies.

Almost 40 percent of respondents indicated they expect to expand their workforce by 2022, but more than a quarter expect automation to create new roles in their companies. 

More than 50 percent of employees of larger companies will need to invest in significant training for their employees to remain relevant, and nearly 50 percent of respondents said they expect their full-time workforce to shrink by 2022 as a result of automation.

In terms of cadence, 29 percent of current workplace tasks will be completed by machines in 2018, 42 percent in 2022, and more than half — 52 percent — by 2025.

I guess the large and lingering question is, which half of which tasks?

We’ll find out soon enough.

Written by turbotodd

September 19, 2018 at 12:34 pm

Automation Nation

leave a comment »

Happy Tuesday.

On the World Cup schedule today: Sweden vs. Switzerland, and Columbia vs. England.

Meanwhile, it’s back to automation nation. Automation Anywhere, a San Jose, California-based robotic process automation startup has announced it raised $250 million in a funding round led by New Enterprise Associates and Goldman Sachs.

According to a report from Venture Beat, Automation Anywhere’s platform employs software robots, or bots, that make business processes self-running:

Using a combination of traditional RPA and cognitive elements such as unstructured data processing and natural language understanding, the system is able to crunch through tasks that normally take hundreds of thousands of human employees.

As to what the company will do with this new round:

The firm plans to spend the bulk of the new capital on deepening customer engagements in North America, India, Europe, Australia, Japan, South Korea, and Singapore, CEO and cofounder Mihir Shukla said in a statement. It also intends to invest in “specialized” machine learning capabilities and new integrations designed to drive “higher operational efficiency” and “flexibility.”

The company’s CEO, Mihir Shukla, was also quoted in the piece as saying that “We believe our Intelligent Digital Workforce Platform can automate up to 80 percent of [an enterprise’s business processes].

That’s far more than its own customers claim can be automated (20 percent).

Written by turbotodd

July 3, 2018 at 10:07 am

Google’s New News

leave a comment »

Google not own enough of your digital life yet?

If no, try the new Google News on iOS, which the company announced at its I/O devcon last week. 

As reported by The Verge, The new Google News on iOS is similar to the one you’ll find on Android, and centers around using machine learning to train algorithms to comb through complex, fast breaking news stories.

It then breaks them down in easy to understand formats like chronological timelines, local news aggregation, and stories presented in the developing and evolving sequence.

The app is organized into four sections now, the first of which is a “For You” personalized list of the top five stories Google’s software think you’ll want to read alongside a few other algorithmically chosen articles and local news stories.

It also includes other sections focused on core headlines, a favorite section, and the “Newsstand,” which lets you subscribe to news organizations who offer a monthly subscription for web or print access or charge a monthly fee to bypass a web pay wall.

News junkie that I am, I went ahead and downloaded the new version of Google News for iOS (hey, it’s free! Well, other than all that information about myself I’m giving away…), and eerily, the first five headlines “For Me” were pretty much spot on.

While I won’t get into specifics of what the stories were, they involved international affairs, golf, and Japanese whiskey, in that order.

All that news that’s fit to print just  for you, and then some.

Written by turbotodd

May 16, 2018 at 9:42 am

Posted in 2018

Tagged with , ,

AI Funding and Talent

leave a comment »

I was too busy to blog yesterday, but a couple of stories about AI funding did hit my radar that I wanted to mention.

TechCrunch reported first that a startup out of London, BenevolventAI, announced that it had raised $115 million “to continue developer its core ‘AI brain’ as well as different arms of the company that are using it specifically to break new ground in drug development and more.”

That round values the company at $2.1 billion. 

Some background:

The core of BenevolentAI’s business is focused around what Mulvaney describes as a “brain” built by a team of scientists — some of whom are disclosed, and some of whom are not, for competitive reasons; Mulvaney said: There are 155 people working at the startup in all, with 300 projected by the end of this year. The brain has been created to ingest and compute billions of data points in specific areas such as health and material science, to help scientists better determine combinations that might finally solve persistently difficult problems in fields like medicine.

The crux of the issue in a field like drug development, for example, is that even as scientists identify the many permutations and strains of, say, a particular kind of cancer, each of these strains can mutate, and that is before you consider that each mutation might behave completely differently depending on which person develops the mutation.

This is precisely the kind of issue that AI, which is massive computational power and “learning” from previous computations, can help address. (And BenevolventAI is not the only one taking this approach. Specifically in cancer, others include Grail and Paige.AI.)

Another one that caught my attention was Eightfold.ai, “a new technology service aimed at solving nothing less than the problem of how to provide professional meaning in the modern world.”

Founded by former Googler and IBM researcher Ashutosh Garg (who is a search and personalization expert), the company “…boasts an executive team that has a combined 80 patents and more than 6,000 citations for their research.

What’s more interesting to me is their mission: “To bring the analytical rigor for which their former employers are famous to the question of how best to help employees find fulfillment in the workforce.”

Lightspeed Ventures and Foundation Capital are among those backing the venture to the tune of $24 million.

How it works:

“We have crawled the web for millions of profiles… including data from Wikipedia,” says Garg. “From there we have gotten data round how people have moved in organizations. We use all of this data to see who has performed well in an organization or not. Now what we do… we build models over this data to see who is capable of doing what.”

There are two important functions at play, according to Garg. The first is developing a talent network of a business — “the talent graph of a company,” he calls it. “On top of that we map how people have gone from one function to another in their career.”

Using those tools, Garg says Eightfold.ai’s services can predict the best path for each employee to reach their full potential.

Did you get that? “Building models for the talent graph of a company and how people have gone from one function to another in their career. I’m calling it a Maslowe AI play!

As for how hot the war for AI talent is, check out this New York Time’s article.  It reveals that AI specialists with little or no industry experience can make between $300K and $500K a year in salary and stock. 

Might be time to go back to school!

Written by turbotodd

April 20, 2018 at 12:47 pm

%d bloggers like this: