Turbotodd

Ruminations on tech, the digital media, and some golf thrown in for good measure.

Archive for the ‘smart infrastructure’ Category

IBM To Acquire Cúram Software

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IBM has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Cúram Software Ltd. to help governments improve the efficiency, effectiveness and accessibility of social programs for smarter cities.

Today, IBM acquired Curam Software, a leading provider of social program software solutions, delivering best-in-class solutions for social enterprises globally including, health and human services, workforce services, and social security organizations.

Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Cúram Software is used in more than 80 government agency projects around the world to provide the most appropriate social programs to citizens and their families in a timely manner, deliver services more effectively, and continuously monitor progress toward achieving people’s social and economic potential.

Who Is Cúram Software?

Cúram Software is the leading provider of social program software solutions, delivering best-in-class solutions for social enterprises globally including, health and human services, workforce services, and social security organizations.

Using Cúram’s solutions, agencies can immediately reap the benefits of client-centric business processes and an outcomes-driven integrated service delivery model Cúram’s solutions, underpinned by the Cúram Social Industry Platform, combines the advantages of software built specifically for social programs, an enterprise platform and service-oriented architecture with the business and technical flexibility required to allow agencies to implement solutions to meet their strategic objectives.

Cúram, which means “care and protection” in Irish, was founded in 1990 and is based in Dublin, Ireland, with offices throughout North America, Europe, Australia, and India.  One of the company’s investors was Enterprise Ireland, which helps Irish companies achieve global success.

How Is Cúram Software Used?

Cúram social managment software is used by health and human services, workforce services, and social security organizations around the world to deliver welfare, social insurance and both individual and employer based social programs.

It allows cities and governments to provide a single view of benefits and services available across agencies, levels of government and private and not-for-profit organizations.

The Social Industry Platform includes processes to deliver all types of programs and offers the flexibility needed to quickly update them as policy makers react to different economic times.

Cúram Software’s Platform also allows government and providers to focus on lowering overall program costs by ensuring that the benefits and services provided address core issues and that people become more self-sufficient.

Cúram And IBM’s Smarter Cities Initiative

Through its Smarter Cities initiative, IBM helps cities and governments serve citizens better by adopting more intelligent and efficient ways to analyze data, anticipate problems and coordinate resources.   IBM has led more than 2,000 projects to achieve these goals and through its acquisition of Cúram Software, IBM expects to extend its leadership in this area.

IDC Government Insights estimates the new Smarter Cities information technology market opportunity at $34 billion in 2011, increasing more than 18 percent per year to $57 billion by 2014.

Today’s news also builds on IBM’s Smarter Cities initiatives in Ireland.  Last year the company opened its first Smarter Cities Technology Center in Dublin at IBM’s R&D Lab,  where IBM works with city authorities, universities, small and large businesses to research, develop and commercialize new ways of making city systems more connected, sustainable and intelligent.

With the addition of the Cúram Research Institute — which is working to develop and deploy new business models for managing social programs — IBM will enhance its ability to help clients increase the social and economic potential of people and their families.“

We are working to help cities and governments at all levels transform the way they interact with citizens while improving efficiency,” said Craig Hayman, General Manager of IBM Industry Solutions.  “We all have stories to tell about standing in long lines or making countless phone calls to gain access to government services, but it doesn’t have to be that way.  Together with Cúram, IBM can transform the way citizens do business with government in a way that benefits everyone.”

Since 1999, IBM and Cúram have collaborated on federal, state, local, and provincial-level social program solutions around the world.  More than 90 percent of Cúram’s clients use IBM WebSphere middleware and nearly 70 percent of its clients use IBM hardware.  Cúram’s software is certified for use with the IBM Government Industry Framework and has been part of IBM Global Business Services’ Integrated Case Management solution since 2001.

“After 13 years of experience working with IBM, we know our companies are an excellent fit”, said John Hearne, CEO, Cúram Software.  “Many of our clients already use IBM technologies and services, and they will benefit from working with Cúram and IBM as one.  Through IBM’s global reach, we can grow our client base by bringing the benefits of Cúram’s Social Industry Platform to citizens around the world.”

IBM’s announcement of its plan to acquire of Cúram Software follows a series of moves IBM made this year to enhance its offerings for cities and governments.   In June, the company introduced the IBM Intelligent Operations Center, which provides a unified view of all city agencies so officials can predict events and quickly respond.  Shortly thereafter, IBM announced it planned to acquire i2, a leading provider of intelligence analytics for crime and fraud prevention.  The acquisition was completed in October.

After the acquisition is completed, Cúram Software will be integrated into IBM’s Software Group, which is a key driver of growth and profitability for the company.  Cúram has approximately 700 employees.

In addition to its headquarters in Dublin, the company has offices in Herndon, VA.; Toronto; Frankfurt, Germany; Canberra, Australia and Bangalore, India.  The acquisition is anticipated to close by the end of December subject to the satisfaction of customary closing conditions and applicable regulatory reviews.

To learn more visit www.cúramsoftware.com.

Back To School

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It’s back to school for Big Blue.

Earlier today, we announced how students at universities around the globe are going to be collaborating on projects to improve cities, transportation, and healthcare — with a little help from IBM.

Fifty professors from 40 universities in 14 countries have been recognized with a Smarter Planet Faculty Innovation award.

IBM created the $10,000 awards to help universities develop innovative new curricula that address the global challenges of infrastructure and services such as education and transportation, with the solutions being implemented in each city for evaluation and improvement.

The idea being, of course, to have these new curricula prepare students for future leadership in a variety of industries by exposing them to Watson-like technologies in the classroom, cultivating collaboration skills and new approaches to innovation.

A couple of examples from this year’s winners:

  • SUNY Buffalo’s project will analyze U.S. Border control data to learn how technology solutions may help improve the sustainability of transportation systems (Each year, American drivers waste an estimated 3.7 billion hours sitting in traffic!)
  • RMIT University in Australia, halfway around the planet, will explore how advanced technology and sensors can help build smarter, interconnected cities.

All the new courses will be taught in the 2011-2012 school year.

Visit here to read more about the winners.

Better yet, check out some of these videos explaining the program and highlighting some of the winners’ efforts.

And go here if you’re interested in learning how to provide submissions for your university for the fall 2011 Smarter Planet Innovation Awards.  Nominations will open the week of May 16th!

Written by turbotodd

May 5, 2011 at 7:24 pm

Live From Impact 2011: IBM Software’s Steve Mills On Business Agility

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Katie Linendoll, the “chic geek” technojournalist for both CNN and CBS, spiritedly kicked off today’s Impact 2011 morning keynote.

Scott and I had the pleasure of interviewing Katie yesterday afternoon for Impact TV, whereupon Katie went out of her way to give Scott a hard time about his pad and paper “Think” pad (Us cool kids both had iPads, albeit mine, a 1st generation, Katie’s the iPad 2).

Katie explained that for today’s session, we were going to focus on the how of building towards business agility, and then promptly introduced IBM Senior VP, Software and Systems, Steve Mills.

Steve had also joined us for an Impact TV interview, on Sunday, and continued to relay to the gathered 8,000+ member audience some of the key messages he had communicated during our interview.

In his comments, Steve pointed out for the audience how well received the IBM customer participation in both keynotes and breakouts has been, and he highlighted several in his talk: Caterpillar, NY State Tax Authority, Isbank (in Turkey), all of whom have realized great efficiencies and agility via business process management.

Mills explained that over the past decade, we’ve collectively been on a journey with SOA to build towards business agility, seizing the opportunity to leverage open standards and start to build more horizontal business processes that were no longer isolated to vertical applications.

SOA, Mills explained, has been about trying to unlock those applications and assets which define your business and the particular processes that make your business run, but that you can’t get there without unlocking your own data and assets.

But Mills also pointed out that there’s not a lot of new things in IT.  Watson, for example, the computer system that recently took on and beat “Jeopardy!” world champions, is not 4 years old. “There’s over 40 years of IT science behind Watson.”

Applause from the Impact audience. Mills continued: “The last four years were really fun. The past 40 were really hard.”

Business agility requires a robust SOA infrastructure, Mills explained, and we at IBM have worked on helping build a complete infrastructure because we understood our customers wanted to tie a lot of services together and to have flexible, high-performing infrastructures.

This, in turn, could help organizations build less, reuse more, and realize significant economic benefit by bringing down the cost of execution (Most businesses today spend 70-80% of their resources managing the runtime of thousands of programs).

Mills comments about the backstory of SOA served as a perfect segueway to the customer story video Katie introduced about how the City of Madrid built a coordinated emergency management response system after the horrible 2004 bombings there, and is now realizing a 25% faster response time for emergencies (and improving all the time).

And, to Phil Gilbert, IBM VP BPM, and his demo of the new IBM Business Process Manager.  Gilbert observed that there are $1T in losses in process inefficiencies every year, and yet both good and bad events have increased in both severity and frequency.

Citing Alfred Sloan, former CEO of General Motors and process improvement guru, he explained that “good management rests on decentralization with coordinated control.”

IBM’s approach to BPM can deliver such coordination.

Written by turbotodd

April 12, 2011 at 4:52 pm

Live from Impact 2011: Q&A With Steve Mills

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Greetings from The Venetian Hotel and Casino in lovely Las Vegas, Nevada.

I’m writing you from a breakfast of thousands (well, it’s so early, it’s only hundreds, but give it time), which means I had to hoof it to the far nether regions of the Venetian’s inner conference sanctum to grab my imitation Egg McMuffin (which was actually pretty good).

I arrived yesterday afternoon via Southwest Airlines. Fortunately, my flight wasn’t a convertible, but it was a couple of hours late. Which, of course, meant that I wasn’t going to arrive in Vegas in time to see the end of the Masters.

Which, of course, proved to have an incredibly dramatic finish. Thank Heavens for the Masters Web site (which IBM helped produce). I was able to get updated scores from the leaderboard on the ground in Phoenix between flights.

When I arrived at McCarran airport, the cab stand line was so long, I thought they might be giving away free rides or something. Needing to be at the Venetian for our opening Webcast by 5:30, I considered walking to my hotel, but figured I might not survive the trek.

So, it was on to a local shuttle which, of course, dropped me off next to last. I was starting to think I wasn’t destined to make it to Impact.

But I finally arrived, successfully, and the rooms at the Venetian were large enough to build our own personal Webcasting studio (if I could just figure out how to raise the blinds!)

Scott Laningham and I met with our IBM media team to prepare for the evening’s Webcasting, a Q&A with IBM Vice President and Group Executive Software and Systems, Steve Mills.

Steve helped set up the big picture for Impact 2011 (he’ll be keynoting tomorrow, Tuesday), discussing everything from SOA to cloud computing to the possibilities presented by the IBM Deep Q&A technology, Watson. You can see our interview with Steve and all the Impact videos here. We’ll be talking to many more IBM execs, partners, and experts over the next three days.

For now, I’m off to catch today’s opening general session, which the calendar handout at breakfast indicates will provide a key SOA announcement from Marie Wieck, the general manager of IBM Software’s Application and Integration Middleware (AIM) organization.

Stay tuned for more from Impact!

Written by turbotodd

April 11, 2011 at 2:11 pm

Smart Grids In The UK

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Well that was a bombshell that AT&T done dropped on the American telco landscape over the weekend.

It was almost as upsetting as Arizona’s last second comeback over my Texas Longhorns in the NCAA.  At this point, my brackets are a complete mess.

If you missed the headline, AT&T announced its intent to acquire T-Mobile USA, Inc. for a cool $39B.  The blogosphere lit up at the news, but GigaOM’s Om Malik ain’t havin’ any of it, saying that everybody loses in this deal.

But that wasn’t the only news in the telco space.  Just this morning, IBM and Cable & Wireless Worldwide announced their collaboration to develop a new intelligent data and communications solution, UK Smart Energy Cloud.

This effort will support the UK’s Smart Meter Implementation Program, which aims to roll out more than 50 million smart meters in the UK.

This cloud will help provide a complete overview of energy usage across the country and pave way for easier implementation of a smart grid (Though there were no confirmed reports that the stadium lights at Stamford Bridge were flickering after Chelsea’s 2-0 victory over Manchester City yesterday PM. Viva Brasil’s David Luiz, even at 21M British pounds!)

The UK Smart Energy Cloud solution will utilize the extensive experience IBM has gained from leading and implementing smart grid programs around the world and its proven enabling software and middleware. And the solution will be supported by C&W Worldwide’s extensive, secure next-generation network and communications integration capability.

IBM has a long history of expertise in smart grid projects, which range from innovative research projects to full scale deployments. In the UK IBM is currently advising three of the six largest energy retailers on transforming their business in preparation for smart metering.

Globally IBM has been involved in more than 150 smart grid programs in mature and emerging markets. Current global projects include working in Malta to create the first nation-wide smart grid and a pilot project with DONG Energy in Denmark to install remote monitoring and control devices to gain information about the state of the grid.

For more information visit the IBM energy Web site.

Texas Pickup

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So I was on a flight from Austin to New York City today.

Charlie Sheen was nowhere to be seen.

But Scott Pelley, the correspondent with “60 Minutes,” was on my flight, and he even had a Texas cowboy hat in tow.  I assume, the native Texan that he is, Pelley was celebrating Texas Independence Day along with the rest of we native Texans.

So, I figured since we’re no longer a republic, I’d go ahead and come visit my second home, the great city of New York, where I’ll be in tow through the weekend, and spending the next couple of days in a variety of meetings.

Back in Viva Las Vegas, our IBM PULSE event pulsed on.  Yesterday, we heard some more key news coming from the event, this time around the ever-ubiquitous IT topic, cloud computing.

In that announcement, IBM showcased a series of technology breakthroughs that extend the company’s leadership in virtualization, image management, and cloud computing, including software that can virtualize a data center within minute to instantly meet business demand.

Instant data center.  You gotta dig that.

The market opportunity for cloud-related technologies, including hardware and software, is expected to grow to $45B by 2013, according to IDC (it was around $17B in 2009).  In other words, demand for big clouds is growing as organizations seek to expand the impact of IT to deliver new and innovative services while realizing the economies of scale the cloud can provide.

The power of the cloud model lies in its ability to harness varying technology investments by enabling rapid and dynamic scheduling, provisioning and management of virtualized computing resources on demand.

Enough backdrop (Get it?  Clouds?  Backdrop?)

First, IBM announced a new, advanced virtual deployment software — now available as an open beta program — that has unmatched dynamic provisioning and scheduling of server resources, two capabilities core to cloud functionality.

While traditional technologies deploy virtual machines slowly, requiring significant hands-on management from IT staff, the new IBM software can deploy a single virtual machine in seconds, dozens in a few minutes and hundreds or thousands at the unrivaled speed of under an hour.

In addition to speed, the new IBM software provides a powerful “image management” system to help organizations install, configure and automate the creation of new virtual machines to better meet business demands, while minimizing costs, complexity and the risk associated with IT deployment.

IBM also announced three new breakthroughs for managing virtual environments.

First, for the automation of IT resources, IBM has expanded the capabilities of Tivoli Provisioning Manager 7.2 to help better manage virtual computing resources by automating best practices for data center provisioning activities.

Second, IBM demonstrated technologies that provide a centralized management platform for hybrid cloud environments for both on and off premise deploments.

And third, the IBM Tivoli Storage Manager for Virtual environments now integrates with and extends clients’ requirements to meet backup and recovery needs, online database and application protection, disaster recovery, reduction in stored data, space management, archiving and retrieval.

In the virtualized environment, this software improves the frequency of backups to reduce the amount of data at risk, and enables faster recovery of data to reduce downtime following a failure. By off-loading backup and restore processes from virtual machines, Tivoli Storage Manager for Virtual Environments allows users and applications to remain productive without disruption.

You can get all the nitty gritty details here.

In the meantime, I’m off to celebrate Texas Independence Day in New York City!

Written by turbotodd

March 2, 2011 at 10:34 pm

IBM’s Virtual Desktop

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Happy Monday.

I never published my picks for this week’s AFC and NFC championship games for the NFL, but I’m going to tell you them after the fact, and just to prove what an Honest Abe I am, I’m going to tell you the good and the bad.

First, I picked Green Bay over the Bears.  Chicago, you’re a wonderful city, if cold this time of year, but I just figured Green Bay QB Aaron Rodgers had the mo going into this game, and I was right.

However, I don’t agree that quickly replacing 2nd stringer Collins with Hanie was a bad idea, as Collins wasn’t getting it done, Cutler was already out, and Hanie went on to complete 13 of 20 passes for 153 yards AND lead two scoring drives.

As for the Jets and the Steelers, well, I had that one all wrong.  But then again, the Jets that showed up in ‘Burgh country were not the same team I saw beat up on the New England Patriots last week.  I don’t know what happened to that team, but my cheer for “Jets, Jets, Jets” was transformed into “Crash, Crash, Crash” to my friends on Facebook.

So, the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Green Bay Packers will play Superbowl XLV at Jerry’s House in Dallas.  Looking forward to it (and, as always, to the TV commercials, silly though many of them will likely be).

Now, back to business.  IBM made an announcement today worthy of a few pixels when we announced the Virtual Desktop for Smart Business, a new mobility offering that provides anytime, anywhere access to personal desktops from mobile devices (including tablets, netbooks, laptops, and thin clients).

This new IBM Virtual Desktop lets Windows or Linux desktops be hosted and managed centrally, which as most IT administrators would concede, can help lower the cost and complexity of managing PC environments as they deploy new apps and automagic software updates (and, in turn, help reduce help desk requests).

The new solution is flexible, in that the Virtual Desktop for Smart Business can be deployed on a customer’s own infrastructure or through an IBM Business Partner’s “private cloud” hosted environment.

IBM Virtual Desktop: Self-Configuring, -Healing, and -Protecting

The IBM Virtual Desktop has self-configuring, self-managing and self-protecting features that enable easy installation and management, plus continuous backup and recovery.

“IBM continues to tackle the needs of smaller companies with powerful solutions that are easy to install, easy to manage and priced right,” said Ken Espiau, Operations Director, Northcom Technologies, an IBM Business Partner. “With IBM’s Virtual Desktop offering, there’s only one console, one system and one implementation to make managing desktops much easier. Our clients can realize benefits of cost savings from the desktop of up to 40% while we’re able to gain a recurring revenue stream on back end management.”

The solution is offered as a pre-integrated, ready-to-run software package priced at $150 per user per year for a one year contract.

IBM Virtual Desktop will be delivered through IBM Business Partners who will provide local consulting, networking and software infrastructure skills to ensure smooth installation. An early adopter program drew strong channel interest with well over 100 IBM Business Partners actively providing feedback and preparing to use the program to tap into the growing demand for desktop virtualization solutions.

IBM Virtual Desktop for Smart Business is available today in North America, the UK, Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Belgium, Netherlands, Luxembourg and Poland (although the $150/user cost is subject to pricing variance local market depending).

IBM plans to make the offering available in China, India, Singapore, Australia and New Zealand at the end of the first quarter of 2011.

IBM Business Partners can take advantage of Virtual Desktop training and sales enablement resources here to get started providing solution bundles with System x server and storage configurations.

Written by turbotodd

January 25, 2011 at 12:18 am

Help Desks In The Clouds

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More IBM clouds are on the horizon.

Today, IBM announced the availability of some new online software services from our Tivoli business that will help provide improved automation and control of IT Service desk functions.

The new solution, which will be offered as a monthly subscription offering, can help organizations large and small with their help desks, which often deal with labor-intensive services like onboarding new hires, fixing laptops, and resolving IT issues.

Many companies struggle with slow, inefficient service request handling because the the core their application support, networking, facilities an IT assets aren’t integrated and depend on manual updates.  Yet IBM estimates that only 5 percent of service and support issues are resolved by self-service, making automation and integration crucial for service management.

To help meet this demand for automating IT service functions, IBM Tivoli Live – service manager will allow clients to start small with IT Service Desk functionality and grow into more extensive IT automation services as a company’s needs change.

Since IBM Tivoli Live –service manager is delivered on the IBM Cloud and based on a subscription model, the service reduces the complexity and management required by on-premise deployment.

There is no need to purchase hardware, software licenses or engage in extensive software configuration. This software-as-a-service is based on IBM’s on-premise, enterprise software that hundreds of clients use today.

In addition to choosing which IT processes clients want to automate first, they can also choose which ones they want to access through the cloud or deploy on-premise.

Unlike competitors, IBM offers software-as-a-service that integrates IT Service Desk with monitoring services that manages the health and performance of IT resources, including operating systems, virtualized servers, middleware and software applications.

This is available by integrating Tivoli Live – service manager with Tivoli Live – monitoring service, offering clients a fully integrated service management environment.

You can learn more about this new offering here.

Written by turbotodd

December 7, 2010 at 3:42 pm

IBM Industry Summit: Smarter City Operations Center With Mike Kehoe

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I did some more roaming around the IBM Industry Summit Expo this past Thursday afternoon just as the action there started to wind down, and I seguewayed from trying to better understand smarter video analytics to that of smarter city operations.

If you’ve seen the IBM TV commercials, you’ve seen our experts talk about the opportunities to make cities smarter around the world.

Well, IBM Smarter City expert, Mike Kehoe, provides a 5-minute video helicopter ride in the video below over what a typical smarter cities operation might look like.

…Oh yeah, and for the five minutes I interviewed Mike, he made me the honorary mayor of Barcelona!

Check out Mike’s excellent flyover below:

Written by turbotodd

November 16, 2010 at 6:06 pm

Remote Kickoff

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World Cup 2010 kicked off in Johannesburg, South Africa, this afternoon (our morning here in Texas).

I’m out of the office for a few days, but I couldn’t let the first game between Mexico and South Africa go unheralded, so hence this quick post.

It was an exciting first match that (don’t read any further if you don’t want to know the score!) ended in a 1-1 draw.

Later today, it’s France and Uruguay, and tomorrow the U.S. and England play their first match (as do Argentina-Nigeria and Korea Republic-Greece).

As mentioned in a prior post, there’s plenty of means by which to follow the action in the digital realm.

And if you don’t care anything whatsoever about following the beautiful game in 2010…well, I just feel sorry for ya!

Meanwhile, back at the remote sensing ranch, I also wanted to share some news emerging from the 2010 Sensors Expo & Conference.

IBM announced a new software development kit called “Mote Runner” there that’s going to provide an open and programmer-friendly platform to connect sensor and actuator motes within a wireless sensor network.

Motes, which are also known as wireless sensor nodes, gather sensory information like temperature, movement, or light and then communicate that data across a network of wireless sensors.

With the cost of transistors ($0.00001 each) plummeting as density increases, companies and governments are working to take advantage of transistor-rich wireless sensor networks and analytics to:

  • Enhance understanding of the internal and external systems that support and impact their businesses
  • Improve the behavior and performance of business and societal systems
  • Make better, more informed decisions in real-time by applying analytics to data captured from sensors
  • Learn about situations occurring in business and societal systems as quickly as they happen

However, many wireless sensor networks used to monitor and react to physical or environmental conditions are proprietary and difficult to program.

This ultimately limits the ability of companies, governments and universities to take advantage of them, and Mote Runner was designed to address these challenges.

For example, Mote Runner could help a building management company deploy sensors throughout a high rise building. The technology would:

  • Enable the company to develop applications for the sensors that provide the ability to monitor equipment, room temperature, water systems and more
  • Allow the company to simulate where the sensors would be positioned throughout the building and test how they would communicate
  • Provide the company with the ability to reprogram the sensors remotely once they have been placed throughout the building

image

Dr. Thorsten Kramp, computer scientist at IBM Research in Zurich, holds a MEMSIC IRIS wireless sensor mote programmed with IBM Mote Runner

“Sensors play an important role in interconnected systems and are critical to helping business leaders understand both what is happening in a system, and what will happen next,” said Charles Lickel, vice president for IBM Software Research about the Mote Runner technology.

“IBM is focused on empowering our clients to use sensors to instantly monitor constantly changing dynamics and apply analytics to understand and act upon these dynamics. Enabling clients to easily program and use sensor networks is core to creating smarter systems, and the new developer tools we are unveiling today will advance our clients’ ability to drive new intelligence into their businesses.”

Software systems are the centerpiece of smart grids, for example, integrating multiple independent products and complex systems to perform their critical functions.

Smart meters, smart appliances and smart homes, all containing embedded software, will be interconnected with numerous back-end software applications to create significant new value for consumers, businesses, and the public.

Available on IBM alphaWorks

To encourage exploration, the Mote Runner software development kit is available free of charge for non-commercial use to universities and students and available as a 90-day evaluation trial for corporate users on the IBM alphaWorks website at www.alphaworks.ibm.com/tech/moterunner.

Free support is provided on the IBM alphaWorks website.

Written by turbotodd

June 11, 2010 at 4:22 pm

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