Turbotodd

Ruminations on tech, the digital media, and some golf thrown in for good measure.

Archive for October 15th, 2012

IBM Announces New Chief Privacy Officer, Christina Peters

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IBM’s new Chief Privacy Officer was announced earlier today. Christina Peters has worked as a practicing attorney with IBM since 1996, and has handled a wide range of complex transactional, policy, compliance, litigation, and cybersecurity matters in the United States and internationally. Peters was educated at Dartmouth College and Harvard Law School, where she was an Executive Editor of the Harvard Law Review.

An important announcement earlier today from IBM: The appointment of the company’s new Chief Privacy Officer, Christina Peters.

Peters has worked as a practicing attorney with IBM since 1996 (first in Germany, later in the US), and has handled a wide range of complex transactional, policy, compliance, litigation, and cybersecurity matters in the United States and internationally.

Peters was educated at Dartmouth College (summa cum laude) and Harvard Law School (magna cum laude), where she was an Executive Editor of the Harvard Law Review.

Following a District of Columbia Circuit clerkship, Peters worked at D.C.-based law firm, Covington & Burling. Prior to joining IBM, she was a Robert Bosch Fellow in Germany, where she worked at the Federal Cartel Authority and Deutsche Telekom.

In her new role, Peters will guide and oversee IBM’s global information policy and practices affecting more than 400,000 employees and thousands of clients. She will lead the company’s global engagement in public policy and industry initiatives on data security and privacy, and continue to serve on the advisory board of the Future of Privacy Forum.

Peters also is responsible for a worldwide team of legal, data protection and technical professionals at IBM who address privacy and data security in the leadership manner expected of the company’s global brand.

IBM was the first major corporation to appoint a Chief Privacy Officer in 2000 and has consistently applied advanced techniques and technologies across its global business operations and practices. IBM’s numerous privacy advancements include:

  • First company to adopt a global privacy code of conduct.
  • First to adopt a genetic non-discrimination policy.
  • First to establish a policy to only advertise on websites with visible privacy statements.

Did You Hear THAT Pin Drop?

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The Raspberry Pi just got an upgrade, with the $35, credit-card sized computer adored by geeks everywhere recently obtaining an upgrade to 512MB RAM, double that what it used to offer at the same price. With this upgrade, the latest Pi can now handle multimedia, high memory and mobile applications. This should also enable the tiny computer to run a future version of an Android 4.0 OS.

Whew.

That’s all I have to say after the brutal 30+ hour journey back home from Singapore.

Jet travel = one big giant petri dish, and after I took ill during the first leg of my trip from Singapore to Tokyo, my sinuses took it upon themselves to become completely inflamed and congested, so I learned yet another helpful travel trick: Pack sinus spray in the carry on at all times.

Fortunately, my head never got to the point that it exploded mid-flight, and I was sentient enough when I landed in Austin to be able to drive home. Where I promptly slept for 10 hours.

The weekend in sport was just as daunting: My UT Longhorns got on the wrong side of the Sooners in the Red River Showdown, my Cowboy’s QB doesn’t know how to count in seconds at the end of a football game, and my New York Yankees lost their beloved captain Derek Jeter in an ankle-wrenching, season-ending heartbreaker, now heading to Detroit down 0-2 to the Tigers in the ALCS.

And then, to awaken today bright and early and discover more potential consolidation in the telecommunications space, this time with SoftBank’s 70% stake its buying in Sprint, which amounted to a $20B U.S. stake!

TechCrunch reported the news brought down the Sprint website overnight.

As has been widely reported, Sprint is well behind in the LTE game, and the SoftBank infusion is expected to help Sprint with their continued rollout of the new network technology, as well as consolidate their position in wi-fi broadband provider, Clearwire.

Faster, cheaper, better. Isn’t that (almost) always the objective in the technology game?

Speaking of, if you’re made in the spirit of a tried and true “Maker Fairean,” DIYer, the new Raspberry Pi is now shipping with double the RAM (512MB!) at the same tiny price tag of $35.

The Raspberry Pi is a credit-card sized computer that runs several variants of Linux and is primed for attraction to emerging growth market countries looking to move into the computing realm at a ridiculously affordable price.

And if that news is music to your geekish ears, also on the Monday morning news run down is Microsoft’s announcement it’s moving into the digital music game, using its X-Box as a music streaming Trojan Horse.

The Xbox Music service will be available through the Xbox Live service, and on Windows 8 tablets, PCs, and Windows mobile phone devices, and will include free and paid models for streaming AND downloads.

While you’re at it, how about delivery of a patch that keeps the  “blue screen of death” from ever darkening my virtual door again?!

Okay, that’s enough silly news banter for the moment.

I have to get back to work — Information On Demand 2012 is less than 7 days away (more on that shortly!). In the meantime, stay tuned for more interviews conducted last week at IBM InterConnect 2012.

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