Turbotodd

Ruminations on tech, the digital media, and some golf thrown in for good measure.

Archive for July 11th, 2012

Shopping In The Great White North

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IBM recently announced a big win in its “smarter commerce” initiative. SHOP.CA, Canada’s largest online e-commerce marketplace, is using analytics software from IBM’s smarter commerce initiative to help engage increasingly empowered online consumers in a unique shopping experience, and build loyalty and sense of community.

A recent IBM survey of more than 2,000 Canadians showed friends and family are by far the most trusted influencers on purchasing decisions, but retailers are also gaining trust among shoppers here.

The same research also identified a growing movement among consumers to use social media to build communities with others who share their interests and tastes, and who consume the same. These strangers then help the consumer make more relevant discoveries and satisfying purchases.

SHOP.CA: One Stop Online Shopping

SHOP.CA’s online marketplace features millions of products across 26 categories and billions in multi-merchant inventory. Its website offers Canadians one-stop access to national and international brands, free shipping, free returns and no cross-border fees.

Also hosting a powerful loyalty program, SHOP.CA Rewards Dollars are offered for both purchases and online activities that generate a purchase, such as sharing a link to a favorite product with a friend, or posting written or video reviews to social media sites like Facebook and Twitter.

“With SHOP.CA, shopping will be forever changed in Canada,” says Don Tapscott, author and world leading business strategist. “It’s going to make shopping ‘social.’ People will become deeply engaged in the community. They’ll learn from each other. They’ll be able to collaborate, and because of the loyalty programs, they’re going to want to come back.”

SHOP.CA selected IBM’s technology as the e-commerce engine to power its consumer storefront, multi-merchant product catalog and SHOP.CA rewards program. IBM will also provide analytics on how site visitors behave and interact, as well as track their searching and buying histories. This data will get SHOP.CA insight on how, when and where to reach shoppers with content and offers personalized to their taste and preferences via mobile or social vehicles.

Smarter Commerce: A $20 Billion Software Market

Estimated at $20 billion for software alone, IBM has defined smarter commerce, a new, unfolding market driven by Web, social and mobile technologies which put more power in the hands of customers.

Today, 70 percent of the consumer’s first interaction with a product or service takes place online, and 64 percent of consumers make a first purchase because of a digital experience. Under the terms of the agreement, IBM is providing SHOP.CA with Coremetrics web analytics delivered through the cloud and IBM WebSphere Commerce Professional.

Go here to learn more about IBM “smarter commerce” solutions.

In the video below, Scott Laningham and I interview Don Tapscott at this year’s SXSW Interactive Festival about how digital technology is changing our world, detailing for us mere mortals its impact on business, education, children, and beyond.

Happy Turbo Blogging Anniversary To Me

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A quick blogger’s note: I just realized today is the seventh anniversary of the Turbo blog.  I “officially” started blogging on July 11, 2005 with a post entitled “Standing Up in the Earthquake.”

It started thus:

Here’s the deal: I’m your new IBM blogger. I know your purchase order didn’t mention anything about getting a blogger, but one of our recent market research studies indicated that you wanted one, and I happened to be standing in a hallway in Armonk with a red target painted on my forehead. 

And yet, even as I was whimsical about this new pursuit, I also took seriously (if jokingly) the potential implications of somehow crossing a line somewhere (remember this was still the early days when peeps were regularly getting fired because of what they were blogging):

As for my day job, you can read my bio above, and I’ll likely be writing more about what I do at IBM here in future posts. However, I keep pretty current on the Blogosphere, and the average life expectancy of the corporate blogger has recently dwindled close to that of the average fruit fly. I figure that now that I’ve started blogging, I’m out of here within the next few hours. 

It seems a few hours has quickly evolved into seven years.

There are a lot of great things about having made this investment in time and energy, but I’m realizing quickly that the best thing about having done this is that I have a record of musings from those past seven years, observations about everything from golf to economics to the business of technology and topics beyond.

Though I was going out on a bit of a limb when I started, I also recognized the blog could potentially create a wealth of other new opportunities.  Opportunities to have my posts syndicated to other vehicles (which it has), opportunities to meet new people (which it did), and even opportunities to travel to far away lands and write about what I saw (which it also did).

But mostly, it gave me the opportunity to exercise my God-given talent of writing, a skill for which I am and have always been most grateful and for which this blog has given me a steady platform for its practice.

So happy blogging anniversary to me…and if you’re still reading this, thank you for sticking around.

Written by turbotodd

July 11, 2012 at 3:52 pm

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