Turbotodd

Ruminations on tech, the digital media, and some golf thrown in for good measure.

Archive for November 10th, 2011

AutoTrader.Com Pulls Into The Passing Lane

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In the market for a car?

AutoTrader.com aggregates in a single location millions of new cars, used cars and certified pre-owned cars from thousands of auto dealers and private sellers and is a leading online resource for auto dealers, individuals and manufacturers to advertise and market their vehicles to in-market shoppers.

Well, IBM announced today that AutoTrader.com, one of the leaders in the online automotive marketplace, is now using IBM technology for smarter commerce as part of its electronic sales order system to simply and accelerate the ordering experience for its dealer and manufacturer customers.

IBM’s Smarter Commerce software makes it easier and faster for AutoTrader’s clients — auto dealers and manufacturers — to promote their vehicles to consumers.

It enables these clients to improve how they sell their cars through AutoTrader.com by simplifying the process to select promotions and configure, capture and complete orders for AutoTrader’s advertising programs.

“Providing access to leading-edge applications of information and technology are core to providing the best online automotive shopping experience,” said Gib Finley, director, Business Applications, at AutoTrader.com. “IBM delivered innovative ordering technology that make it as easy as possible for our clients to do business with us.”

AutoTrader.com is using IBM’s Sterling Commerce Configure, Price, Quote software to simplify the configuration and capture of orders for its advertising solutions.

The software integrates easily with AutoTrader.com home-grown applications to provide customers with easier, more efficient ways of ordering cars online.

It also guides a car dealership on how to quickly and easily put together an advertisement that best flaunts the dealerships’ new, used or pre-owned vehicles for sale — then helps that dealership select the best package to most effectively reach its prospective customers through context-sensitive capabilities.

AutoTrader.com IT delivered its Electronic Sales Order System (ESO) as a component of the company’s overall business strategy to dramatically improve the way people research, locate and advertise vehicles.

With Smarter Commerce, the company has been recognized for its use of service-oriented architecture (SOA), master data management, sales catalog, order configuration, information management and real-time business intelligence.

In fact, AutoTrader.com was named to the 2010 InformationWeek 500 (InformationWeek‘s annual listing of the nation’s most innovative users of business technology) for its work developing ESO.

Visit AutoTrader.com if you’re in the market for a new car, or IBM’s Smarter Commerce site if you’re in the new market for some award-winning e-commerce technology.

Written by turbotodd

November 10, 2011 at 4:42 pm

Flash In The Pan

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I started reading Walter Isaacson’s biography of Steve Jobs the other day.

No, I’m not reading it on the iPad.  This one, I picked up the actual pulp edition. The weight of the book (it’s some 600+ pages) feels suited to the task of conveying Jobs’ complicated and complex and marvelous life.

And after Adobe’s announcement yesterday that Adobe would no longer use Flash for the browser programs used for smartphones and tablets, you could hear Jobs laughing from his grave.

Surely you remember when Jobs purposely prevented Flash from working on iPhones and iPads — I certainly couldn’t forget, as I have both devices, and the Flash gap on the iPad became obvious very quick.

But there was a lot of history behind this strategy, and Jobs had a long memory. In the book, he recounts the story of asking Adobe to make a Mac version of Premiere back in 1999, and Adobe refused.

Jobs was more than ever convinced he needed to build a strategy that would allow him to tie the hardware and software together, and control the entire ecosystem.

The next thing you know, we had the iPod, iTunes, the iTunes store, the iPhone, the iPad…you get the picture.

But Adobe’s sudden detour, in which they announced they’re instead going to embrace HTML5, could signal a new kind of platform war, one led by programming excellence rather than proprietary regimes.

As more and more of the once open-standards Web starts to see the return of walled (or, at least, semi-walled) gardens, it’s refreshing to see an expanded embrace of HTML5. I believe this will drive innovation and force the mobile and web experiences to compete on usability, merit, and utility, as opposed to plug-in dominance and proprietary lock-in battles.

Of course, there are significant economic benefits this move as well, as Adobe can help its clients develop once to run applications across multiple platforms, eliminating the need for costly platform adjustments and tuning, and freeing up time and energy to focus on innovation.

It’s too bad Steve Jobs wasn’t around to witness this firsthand.

But something tells me he would probably have approved…even if might have done so wearing a big, wide smirk on his face.

Written by turbotodd

November 10, 2011 at 3:43 pm

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