Turbotodd

Ruminations on tech, the digital media, and some golf thrown in for good measure.

Archive for February 21st, 2010

Smarter Software, Better Business

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I went for a walkabout along the Las Vegas Strip late this morning, partially to walk off some of the jetlag and partially to do a quick photo safari.

I’ll work to share some of the pics later, but for now I wanted to share some thoughts about how software is changing the way we live on our smarter planet, which I think will provide you with a broad backdrop for the kickoff of IBM Pulse 2010 and the news that will soon begin to emanate from here in Vegas.

Be forewarned, this is a lengthier post than usual, so settle in.

On a smarter planet, people consume only what they need, when they need it — my excursion to McDonald’s this AM for breakfast aside.

By way of example, IBM is working with a leading international energy provider to launch an automated energy management system to help over 11K households to better control their energy usage.

With such a system, users will be able to establish consumption protocols to minimize electricity use in peak periods and to take full advantage of renewable energy resources when available.

On a smarter planet, people also know the best way to get from point A to point B (Note: My hopscotch trip across Europe last week was not such a journey!).

The Singapore Land Transportation Authority is building just such a capability with improvements on one of the most modern, affordable and heavily used public transport networks in the world. It includes an integrated payment option that can be used for the bus or the train, plus parking and vehicle congestion charges.

But the improvements don’t end at the bus stop — the system will also be studying commuter usage data to help design and maximize schedules and routes that will further reduce congestion.

On a smarter planet, people use smarter software to see hidden patterns.

Like at a major health insurance company, which is creating a first-of-its-kind healthcare data aggregation system that will provide information on how people receive treatment for everything from a sore foot to an ailing heart.  Such a system will yield insights that empower companies to develop employee healthcare plans that provide the highest-quality care at the best value.

(I just hope they include jetlag in their menu of studied conditions!)

In each of these examples is a business, government, or industry that has used software in new ways.

Today, more than ever, organizations use software to enable every facet of their business, but with new models and ways of working also come new challenges.

As a result, a new set of needs has emerged.  How to turn information into insights.  To increase agility.  To connect and collaborate.  To enable business service and product innovation.  To drive enterprise operations effectiveness and efficiency.  And to manage risk, security, and compliance.

Addressing these needs requires smarter software.

Smarter software which knows and acts.   Which connects and adapts.  Which monitors, controls, and optimizes.  And which even protects and helps mitigate risk.

We at IBM believe our software can make the world better, one client at a time.  Though a lot of other companies claim to do the same thing, their software doesn’t work like IBM software.

We know what it takes to solve our clients’ biggest challenges, and we’ve spent the last 50 years delivering software that is fueled by expertise, is built for change, and is ready for work.

IBM Software is fueled by expertise, and by knowledge as to how to apply software for real results.

We know industries, the world of business, and how work actually gets done.

We also know systems, both natural and man-made, and we have the proof points to back it up:

40 innovation centers worldwide, focused on solutions for dozens of industries.  26,000 developers.  80 R&D labs. 30K partners worldwide.  And the world’s largest math department.

IBM software is built for change, because it’s open, easily integrated, and flexible.  It’s built with a systems point of view.

Old, new, ours, theirs…we don’t care, so long as we have the opportunity to make it all work together, and to make it work for your busines.

But we also have forward-looking labs and researchers whose sole purpose is to help our clients be prepared for the future.  In the last several years, we’ve made over 100 acquisitions, established 300 SOA patents, and contributed to over 150 open source projects, more than any other company.

We’ve also invested over $1B in Linux and open source technologies, and continue to invest several hundred dollars annually.

That’s putting our money where the penguin’s mouth is.

And IBM software is ready for work.

It’s software that’s robust, industrial-strength, proven, and ready to scale. And we at IBM work to provide ongoing service that helps ensure our clients’ success, because we want to see our software solve their greatest challenges and create new value.

To do so, we have 60 laboratories around the globe that practice agile development and work hand in hand with clients, business partners, and academia, and 17K sales and 5K support staff to help along the way.

Let us help you build a smarter company and a smarter planet by helping you see your hidden patterns, recognize your problems before it’s too late, find your best way from point A to B.

Together, we can build better software to in turn build a smarter planet.

This week at IBM Pulse 2010 in Las Vegas, you’ll hear more about how.

IBM Pulse 2010: The Wide Shot

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I’ve overcome my jetlag enough to produce this quick introductory video for IBM Pulse 2010 here in Vegas, complete with a few housekeeping details.

Due to the aforementioned jetlag, I was up well before most of the poker players had gone home for the night (not that I would know anything about such a thing), and early this AM IBM Pulse 2010 was already coming to life.

I’ve now got my badge, I kind of know my way around, and I am looking forward to running into some of you over the next few days.

In the meantime, enjoy your Sunday and for those of you still on your way to Vegas, safe travels (the weather is nice out, with a cool temp of around 48 degrees Fahrenheit and an expected high today of 61!)

Written by turbotodd

February 21, 2010 at 5:11 pm

A Well Dressed (and Jet Lagged) Man

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NOTE: This post was written while still in Milan, but published after arriving yesterday early evening in Las Vegas.  British Airways did not provide wifi access on the Milan-to-Vegas flight.

Greetings from the Milan Linate airport.

My short week in Europe has come to a fast end, but not before I had the opportunity to get out and see the Duomo in downtown Milan.

On my last trip here, I arrived in Milan on a Sunday evening, and had to immediately leave the IBM site to drive straight to Nice, so I didn’t have the opportunity to visit the city center.

There’s but no question the Duomo is worth visiting. The church is spectacular, having been built in the early Renaissance and simply breathtaking in its beauty.

As to the food in Milan, it’s like anywhere else I’ve ever been in Italy – scrumptious. The Italians can take a simple plate of penne pasta and turn it into magic in your mouth. Mmm, mmmm, mmmm.

Before dinner last evening, my IBM amigo Michael and I took in a little Milano fashion expedition. After joking about my poor fashion sense in previous blog posts, I decided I couldn’t leave one of the fashion capitals of the world without at least trying on some fine Italian threads.

I ended up walking out of the store with a very nice Italian sport coat and a couple of gorgeous shorts, my wallet hardly the worse for the wear. Austin will never know what hit ’em (although it’ll probably take a funeral or a wedding for me to pull them out of the closet…Austin’s pretty laid back when it comes to dress, even for bidness).

But, before I get to head back to Austin, I have one last stop to make, that mentioned pit stop in Las Vegas. For anyone glorifying the jetsetting lifestyle, know that my Saturday goes something like this:

Arrive at the Milan airport around 11:30 AM local time. Sit in the BA lounge until boarding my flight, which leaves for London around 1:40. Arrive in London a couple of hours later, sit around the airport there for a couple of hours, then board the flight to Vegas which is 10 ½ hours (in economy class, of course).

That means I’ll have arrived in Vegas sometime around 4:30 am Milano time Sunday morning.

But in all my jetlagged weariness, I’ll have some fond memories of meeting some new IBM colleagues in Stuttgart, Madrid, and Milan, and hopefully of my team and I having helped them continue to improve their Web marketing efforts.

More from Vegas and the IBM Pulse 2010 event soon.

Written by turbotodd

February 21, 2010 at 2:16 pm

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